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Appropriateness of therapy for fistulizing Crohn's disease: findings from a national inflammatory bowel disease cohort


Pittet, V; Juillerat, P; Michetti, P; Vader, J P; Burnand, B; Rogler, G; Beglinger, C; Seibold, F; Mottet, C; Felley, C; Gonvers, J J; Froehlich, F; et al; Braegger, C P (2010). Appropriateness of therapy for fistulizing Crohn's disease: findings from a national inflammatory bowel disease cohort. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 32(8):1007-1016.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: About 30-50% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) develop fistulae, implying significant disease burden and complicated clinical management.

AIM: To assess appropriate use of therapy for fistulizing CD patients enrolled in the Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort using criteria developed by the European Panel on the Appropriateness of Crohn's disease Therapy.

METHODS: Specific questionnaires were used to gather information on disease and its management. We assessed appropriateness of therapy at enrolment for adult CD patients with one or several fistulae.

RESULTS: Two hundred and eighty-eight CD patients had fistulizing disease, of which 80% had complex fistulae and 32% currently had active draining fistulae. Mean age (s.d.) at diagnosis was 27 years (11), 51% males. Of the patients, 78% were judged as having globally an appropriate therapy, which was more often given for complex fistulae (87%) than for simple fistulae (67%). Antibiotics, azathioprine/MP, methotrexate and conservative surgery were almost always appropriate. Anti-tumor necrosis factor α was considered globally appropriate (91%), although most often with an uncertain indication. The 5ASA compounds, steroids and aggressive surgery were most often inappropriate (84%, 58% and 86% respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: Formal appropriateness criteria for CD therapy were applied to a national cohort of IBD patients. For more than three-quarters of the patients with fistulizing CD, therapy was globally appropriate.
© 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: About 30-50% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) develop fistulae, implying significant disease burden and complicated clinical management.

AIM: To assess appropriate use of therapy for fistulizing CD patients enrolled in the Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort using criteria developed by the European Panel on the Appropriateness of Crohn's disease Therapy.

METHODS: Specific questionnaires were used to gather information on disease and its management. We assessed appropriateness of therapy at enrolment for adult CD patients with one or several fistulae.

RESULTS: Two hundred and eighty-eight CD patients had fistulizing disease, of which 80% had complex fistulae and 32% currently had active draining fistulae. Mean age (s.d.) at diagnosis was 27 years (11), 51% males. Of the patients, 78% were judged as having globally an appropriate therapy, which was more often given for complex fistulae (87%) than for simple fistulae (67%). Antibiotics, azathioprine/MP, methotrexate and conservative surgery were almost always appropriate. Anti-tumor necrosis factor α was considered globally appropriate (91%), although most often with an uncertain indication. The 5ASA compounds, steroids and aggressive surgery were most often inappropriate (84%, 58% and 86% respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: Formal appropriateness criteria for CD therapy were applied to a national cohort of IBD patients. For more than three-quarters of the patients with fistulizing CD, therapy was globally appropriate.
© 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:22 Jan 2011 16:12
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 18:07
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0269-2813
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2010.04434.x
PubMed ID:20937046

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