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Comparison of two different methods for physiologic dead space measurements in ventilated dogs in a clinical setting


Mosing, M; Staub, L; Moens, Y (2010). Comparison of two different methods for physiologic dead space measurements in ventilated dogs in a clinical setting. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, 37:393-499.

Abstract

Objective  To compare physiologic dead space (VD) and physiologic dead space to tidal volume (VT) ratio (VD/VT) obtained by an automated single breath test for carbon dioxide (CO2) (method SBT) and a manual calculation (method MC) in ventilated healthy dogs.

Study design  Prospective clinical study.

Animals  Twenty client-owned dogs, ASA I and II undergoing anaesthesia for clinical purposes.

Methods  Following pre-medication, induction of anaesthesia, and intubation of the trachea, intermittent positive pressure ventilation was commenced. Mixed expired CO2 partial pressure (PēCO2) was measured by two methods: method MC by analysis, using an infrared capnograph, of the expired gas collected in a mixing box and method SBT which calculated it automatically by a device consisting of a mainstream capnograph and a pneumotachograph. At four time points arterial partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2) was measured. Physiologic dead space variables (VD and VD/VT) were calculated manually (method MC) or automatically (method SBT) using the Bohr–Enghoff equation.

Method MC and SBT were compared using Bland–Altman plots and linear regression. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to measure consistency of each method.

Results  Four measurement pairs were obtained in all 20 dogs for method SBT and MC. The bias was −1.15 mmHg, 7.97 mL and 0.02 for PēCO2, VD and VD/VT, respectively. Linear regression analysis revealed a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.79, 0.94, and 0.83 for PēCO2, VD and VD/VT, respectively. The ICC revealed an excellent consistency for both methods.

Conclusions  The single breath test (SBT) can be used for clinical evaluation of VD and VD/VT in anaesthetized ventilated dogs.

Clinical relevance  Through measuring VD and VD/VT important information about lung ventilation can be obtained and the SBT is an easy method to use for this purpose.

Abstract

Objective  To compare physiologic dead space (VD) and physiologic dead space to tidal volume (VT) ratio (VD/VT) obtained by an automated single breath test for carbon dioxide (CO2) (method SBT) and a manual calculation (method MC) in ventilated healthy dogs.

Study design  Prospective clinical study.

Animals  Twenty client-owned dogs, ASA I and II undergoing anaesthesia for clinical purposes.

Methods  Following pre-medication, induction of anaesthesia, and intubation of the trachea, intermittent positive pressure ventilation was commenced. Mixed expired CO2 partial pressure (PēCO2) was measured by two methods: method MC by analysis, using an infrared capnograph, of the expired gas collected in a mixing box and method SBT which calculated it automatically by a device consisting of a mainstream capnograph and a pneumotachograph. At four time points arterial partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2) was measured. Physiologic dead space variables (VD and VD/VT) were calculated manually (method MC) or automatically (method SBT) using the Bohr–Enghoff equation.

Method MC and SBT were compared using Bland–Altman plots and linear regression. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to measure consistency of each method.

Results  Four measurement pairs were obtained in all 20 dogs for method SBT and MC. The bias was −1.15 mmHg, 7.97 mL and 0.02 for PēCO2, VD and VD/VT, respectively. Linear regression analysis revealed a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.79, 0.94, and 0.83 for PēCO2, VD and VD/VT, respectively. The ICC revealed an excellent consistency for both methods.

Conclusions  The single breath test (SBT) can be used for clinical evaluation of VD and VD/VT in anaesthetized ventilated dogs.

Clinical relevance  Through measuring VD and VD/VT important information about lung ventilation can be obtained and the SBT is an easy method to use for this purpose.

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4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:21 Jan 2011 11:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:37
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1467-7644
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-2995.2010.00548.x
PubMed ID:20712605

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