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Head position during resting modifies spontaneous daytime decrease of downbeat nystagmus


Spiegel, R; Kalla, R; Rettinger, N; Schneider, E; Straumann, D; Marti, S; Glasauer, S; Brandt, T; Strupp, M (2010). Head position during resting modifies spontaneous daytime decrease of downbeat nystagmus. Neurology, 75(21):1928-1932.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The intensity of downbeat nystagmus (DBN) decreases during the daytime when the head is in upright position.

OBJECTIVE: This prospective study investigated whether resting in different head positions (upright, supine, prone) modulates the intensity of DBN after resting.

METHODS: Eye movements of 9 patients with DBN due to cerebellar (n = 2) or unknown etiology (n = 7) were recorded with video-oculography. Mean slow-phase velocities (SPV) of DBN were determined in the upright position before resting at 9 am and then after 2 hours (11 am) and after 4 hours (1 pm) of resting. Whole-body positions during resting were upright, supine, or prone. The effects of all 3 resting positions were assessed on 3 separate days in each patient.

RESULTS: Before resting (9 am), the average SPV ranged from 3.05 °/s to 3.6 °/s on the separate days of measurement. After resting in an upright position, the average SPV at 11 am and 1 pm was 0.65 °/sec, which was less (p < 0.05) than after resting in supine (2.1 °/sec) or prone (2.22 °/sec) positions.

CONCLUSION: DBN measured during the daytime in an upright position becomes minimal after the patient has rested upright. The spontaneous decrease of DBN is less pronounced when patients lie down to rest. This indicates a modulation by otolithic input. We recommend that patients with DBN rest in an upright position during the daytime. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with DBN 2 hours of rest in the upright position decreases nystagmus more than 2 hours of rest in the supine or prone positions (relative improvement 79% upright, 33% supine, and 38% prone: p < 0.05).

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The intensity of downbeat nystagmus (DBN) decreases during the daytime when the head is in upright position.

OBJECTIVE: This prospective study investigated whether resting in different head positions (upright, supine, prone) modulates the intensity of DBN after resting.

METHODS: Eye movements of 9 patients with DBN due to cerebellar (n = 2) or unknown etiology (n = 7) were recorded with video-oculography. Mean slow-phase velocities (SPV) of DBN were determined in the upright position before resting at 9 am and then after 2 hours (11 am) and after 4 hours (1 pm) of resting. Whole-body positions during resting were upright, supine, or prone. The effects of all 3 resting positions were assessed on 3 separate days in each patient.

RESULTS: Before resting (9 am), the average SPV ranged from 3.05 °/s to 3.6 °/s on the separate days of measurement. After resting in an upright position, the average SPV at 11 am and 1 pm was 0.65 °/sec, which was less (p < 0.05) than after resting in supine (2.1 °/sec) or prone (2.22 °/sec) positions.

CONCLUSION: DBN measured during the daytime in an upright position becomes minimal after the patient has rested upright. The spontaneous decrease of DBN is less pronounced when patients lie down to rest. This indicates a modulation by otolithic input. We recommend that patients with DBN rest in an upright position during the daytime. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with DBN 2 hours of rest in the upright position decreases nystagmus more than 2 hours of rest in the supine or prone positions (relative improvement 79% upright, 33% supine, and 38% prone: p < 0.05).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:26 Jan 2011 19:17
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 06:12
Publisher:American Academy of Neurology
ISSN:0028-3878
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181feb22f
PubMed ID:21098408

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