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World Allergy Organization survey on global availability of essentials for the assessment and management of anaphylaxis by allergy-immunology specialists in health care settings


Simons, F E R; World Allergy Organization (2010). World Allergy Organization survey on global availability of essentials for the assessment and management of anaphylaxis by allergy-immunology specialists in health care settings. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 104(5):405-412.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The availability of anaphylaxis guidelines and of medications, supplies, and equipment for the assessment and management of anaphylaxis by allergy-immunology specialists in health care settings worldwide is unknown.

OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the global availability of these essentials.

METHODS: A survey instrument was developed and sent by e-mail in 2008 to a nonrandomized convenience sample of representative leading allergy-immunology specialists in 52 countries identified through the World Allergy Organization. Responses were analyzed by country.

RESULTS: Surveys were returned from 44 of 52 countries on 6 continents, for an 85% response rate. Anaphylaxis guidelines were reported to be in use in 70% of the 44 responding countries. The diagnosis of acute anaphylaxis was reported to be based on clinical history and physical examination alone in 63% of responding countries. Medications for anaphylaxis treatment were reported to be available in the 44 responding countries as follows: epinephrine (adrenaline) for injection, 100%; any intravenous glucocorticoid, 89%; any intravenous H1-antihistamine, 77%; any intravenous H2-antihistamine, 70%; glucagon, 73%; atropine, 73%; dopamine, 86%; noradrenaline, 70%; vasopressin, 64%; and a beta 2-agonist for nebulization, 86%. Supplies and equipment for anaphylaxis treatment were reported to be available in responding countries as follows: for giving supplemental oxygen, 95%; for intubation, 89%; for giving intravenous fluid resuscitation, 91%; for monitoring oxygenation using pulse oximetry, 91%; and for continuous noninvasive blood pressure and cardiac monitoring, 81%.

CONCLUSIONS: Allergy-immunology specialists reported that except for epinephrine ampules life-saving essentials for the assessment and management of anaphylaxis in health care settings were not universally available worldwide in 2008.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The availability of anaphylaxis guidelines and of medications, supplies, and equipment for the assessment and management of anaphylaxis by allergy-immunology specialists in health care settings worldwide is unknown.

OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the global availability of these essentials.

METHODS: A survey instrument was developed and sent by e-mail in 2008 to a nonrandomized convenience sample of representative leading allergy-immunology specialists in 52 countries identified through the World Allergy Organization. Responses were analyzed by country.

RESULTS: Surveys were returned from 44 of 52 countries on 6 continents, for an 85% response rate. Anaphylaxis guidelines were reported to be in use in 70% of the 44 responding countries. The diagnosis of acute anaphylaxis was reported to be based on clinical history and physical examination alone in 63% of responding countries. Medications for anaphylaxis treatment were reported to be available in the 44 responding countries as follows: epinephrine (adrenaline) for injection, 100%; any intravenous glucocorticoid, 89%; any intravenous H1-antihistamine, 77%; any intravenous H2-antihistamine, 70%; glucagon, 73%; atropine, 73%; dopamine, 86%; noradrenaline, 70%; vasopressin, 64%; and a beta 2-agonist for nebulization, 86%. Supplies and equipment for anaphylaxis treatment were reported to be available in responding countries as follows: for giving supplemental oxygen, 95%; for intubation, 89%; for giving intravenous fluid resuscitation, 91%; for monitoring oxygenation using pulse oximetry, 91%; and for continuous noninvasive blood pressure and cardiac monitoring, 81%.

CONCLUSIONS: Allergy-immunology specialists reported that except for epinephrine ampules life-saving essentials for the assessment and management of anaphylaxis in health care settings were not universally available worldwide in 2008.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:27 Jan 2011 19:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:38
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1081-1206
Additional Information:Comment in: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010 May;104(5):359-60.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2010.01.023
PubMed ID:20486330

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