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Supporting stepwise, incremental product derivation in product line requirements engineering


Stoiber, R; Glinz, M (2010). Supporting stepwise, incremental product derivation in product line requirements engineering. In: Fourth International Workshop on Variability Modelling of Software-intensive Systems (VaMoS'10), Namur, Belgium, 27 January 2010 - 29 January 2010, 77-84.

Abstract

Deriving products from a software product line is difficult, particularly when there are many constraints in the variability of the product line. Understanding the impact of variability binding decisions (i.e. of selecting or dismissing features) is a particular challenge: (i) the decisions taken must not violate any variability constraint, and (ii) the effects and consequences of every variability decision need to be understood well. This problem can be reduced significantly with good support both for variability specification and decision making. We have developed an extension of the \textsc{Adora} language and tool which is capable of modeling and visualizing both the functionality and the variability of a product line in a single model and provides automated reasoning on the variability space. In this paper we describe how our approach supports stepwise, incremental derivation of a product requirements specification from a product line specification. We visualize what has been derived so far, automatically re-evaluate the variability constraints and propagate the results as restrictions on the remaining product derivation options. We demonstrate our approach by showing a sequence of product derivation steps in an example from the industrial automation domain. We claim that our approach both improves the efficiency and quality of the derivation process.

Abstract

Deriving products from a software product line is difficult, particularly when there are many constraints in the variability of the product line. Understanding the impact of variability binding decisions (i.e. of selecting or dismissing features) is a particular challenge: (i) the decisions taken must not violate any variability constraint, and (ii) the effects and consequences of every variability decision need to be understood well. This problem can be reduced significantly with good support both for variability specification and decision making. We have developed an extension of the \textsc{Adora} language and tool which is capable of modeling and visualizing both the functionality and the variability of a product line in a single model and provides automated reasoning on the variability space. In this paper we describe how our approach supports stepwise, incremental derivation of a product requirements specification from a product line specification. We visualize what has been derived so far, automatically re-evaluate the variability constraints and propagate the results as restrictions on the remaining product derivation options. We demonstrate our approach by showing a sequence of product derivation steps in an example from the industrial automation domain. We claim that our approach both improves the efficiency and quality of the derivation process.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Event End Date:29 January 2010
Deposited On:11 Feb 2011 17:29
Last Modified:11 Aug 2017 23:07
Series Name:ICB-Research Report
Number:37
Related URLs:http://www.vamos-workshop.net (Publisher)
Other Identification Number:1294

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