Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Neurochemical alterations in women with borderline personality disorder and comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder


Rüsch, N; Boeker, M; Büchert, M; Glauche, V; Bohrmann, C; Ebert, D; Lieb, K; Hennig, J; Tebartz van Elst, L (2010). Neurochemical alterations in women with borderline personality disorder and comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, 11(2 Pt 2):372-381.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with structural and functional brain changes. Recent models and findings refer to alterations of glutamate and total N-acetylaspartate (tNAA) in this condition.

METHODS: Absolute quantities of tNAA, creatine, glutamate, glutamine, myoinositol and total choline were measured using 3 Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the left anterior cingulate cortex and the left cerebellum in 14 unmedicated women with BPD and comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 18 healthy women. Both groups were matched with respect to age, education and premorbid intelligence.

RESULTS: In the anterior cingulate, we found significantly higher tNAA and glutamate concentrations and a trend for lower glutamine levels in women with BPD and comorbid ADHD as compared to healthy women. There were no significant group differences in cerebellar metabolite concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS: Glutamatergic changes in the anterior cingulate may be associated with BPD and comorbid ADHD. Increased anterior cingulate tNAA may indicate disturbed energy metabolism or impaired frontal maturation.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with structural and functional brain changes. Recent models and findings refer to alterations of glutamate and total N-acetylaspartate (tNAA) in this condition.

METHODS: Absolute quantities of tNAA, creatine, glutamate, glutamine, myoinositol and total choline were measured using 3 Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the left anterior cingulate cortex and the left cerebellum in 14 unmedicated women with BPD and comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 18 healthy women. Both groups were matched with respect to age, education and premorbid intelligence.

RESULTS: In the anterior cingulate, we found significantly higher tNAA and glutamate concentrations and a trend for lower glutamine levels in women with BPD and comorbid ADHD as compared to healthy women. There were no significant group differences in cerebellar metabolite concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS: Glutamatergic changes in the anterior cingulate may be associated with BPD and comorbid ADHD. Increased anterior cingulate tNAA may indicate disturbed energy metabolism or impaired frontal maturation.

Statistics

Citations

8 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 31 Jan 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:31 Jan 2011 15:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:39
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1562-2975
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3109/15622970801958331
Related URLs:http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/15622970801958331 (Publisher)
PubMed ID:20218799

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations