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Violence in sleep


Siclari, F; Khatami, R; Urbaniok, F; Nobili, L; Mahowald, M W; Schenck, C H; Cramer Bornemann, M A; Bassetti, C L (2010). Violence in sleep. Brain: A Journal of Neurology, 133(Pt 12):3494-3509.

Abstract

Although generally considered as mutually exclusive, violence and sleep can coexist. Violence related to the sleep period is probably more frequent than generally assumed and can be observed in various conditions including parasomnias (such as arousal disorders and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder), epilepsy (in particular nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy) and psychiatric diseases (including delirium and dissociative states). Important advances in the fields of genetics, neuroimaging and behavioural neurology have expanded the understanding of the mechanisms underlying violence and its particular relation to sleep. The present review outlines the different sleep disorders associated with violence and aims at providing information on diagnosis, therapy and forensic issues. It also discusses current pathophysiological models, establishing a link between sleep-related violence and violence observed in other settings.

Abstract

Although generally considered as mutually exclusive, violence and sleep can coexist. Violence related to the sleep period is probably more frequent than generally assumed and can be observed in various conditions including parasomnias (such as arousal disorders and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder), epilepsy (in particular nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy) and psychiatric diseases (including delirium and dissociative states). Important advances in the fields of genetics, neuroimaging and behavioural neurology have expanded the understanding of the mechanisms underlying violence and its particular relation to sleep. The present review outlines the different sleep disorders associated with violence and aims at providing information on diagnosis, therapy and forensic issues. It also discusses current pathophysiological models, establishing a link between sleep-related violence and violence observed in other settings.

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41 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:28 Jan 2011 17:00
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 06:33
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0006-8950
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awq296
PubMed ID:21126993

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