Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Prevalence of Chlamydophila psittaci in wild birds - potential risk for domestic poultry, pet birds and public health?


Zweifel, D. Prevalence of Chlamydophila psittaci in wild birds - potential risk for domestic poultry, pet birds and public health? 2009, University of Zurich, Vetsuisse Faculty.

Abstract

To determine the prevalence of Chlamydophila (C.) psittaci in wild birds, cloacal swabs from 527 songbirds, 442 waterfowl, 84 feral pigeons and 38 cormorants were examined by Chlamydiaceae-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ArrayTube microarray assays for chlamydial species determination and genotyping of C. psittaci. Inconclusive cases were further characterized by conventional PCR methods targeting the chlamydial outer membrane protein A, 16S, 23S, and intrgenic spacer genes followed by sequencing of the PCR product. Swabs of 19 water birds (tufted ducks and pochards), 12 pigeons and one songbird were tested positive by the Chlamydiaceae-specific real-time PCR. While C. psittaci genotypes B (n=5) and E (n=1) were identified in feral pigeons (n=9), the genotype could not be identified in the remaining three cases. Sequence data of Chlamydiaceae-positive cases (n=23; 19 waterfowl, three pigeons, one songbird) indicated the presence of non-classified chlamydial agents (n=20) and C. psittaci (n=3) by 16S rRNA PCR and sequencing. In conclusion, C. psittaci was not detected in waterfowl and songbirds, but C. psittaci proved prevalent in urban feral pigeons, where it poses a significant risk for humans.

Abstract

To determine the prevalence of Chlamydophila (C.) psittaci in wild birds, cloacal swabs from 527 songbirds, 442 waterfowl, 84 feral pigeons and 38 cormorants were examined by Chlamydiaceae-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ArrayTube microarray assays for chlamydial species determination and genotyping of C. psittaci. Inconclusive cases were further characterized by conventional PCR methods targeting the chlamydial outer membrane protein A, 16S, 23S, and intrgenic spacer genes followed by sequencing of the PCR product. Swabs of 19 water birds (tufted ducks and pochards), 12 pigeons and one songbird were tested positive by the Chlamydiaceae-specific real-time PCR. While C. psittaci genotypes B (n=5) and E (n=1) were identified in feral pigeons (n=9), the genotype could not be identified in the remaining three cases. Sequence data of Chlamydiaceae-positive cases (n=23; 19 waterfowl, three pigeons, one songbird) indicated the presence of non-classified chlamydial agents (n=20) and C. psittaci (n=3) by 16S rRNA PCR and sequencing. In conclusion, C. psittaci was not detected in waterfowl and songbirds, but C. psittaci proved prevalent in urban feral pigeons, where it poses a significant risk for humans.

Statistics

Downloads

12 downloads since deposited on 08 Feb 2011
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Pospischil A, Hoop R
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:08 Feb 2011 14:53
Last Modified:12 Aug 2017 07:23
Number of Pages:7
Additional Information:Prevalence of Chlamydophila psittaci in wild birds : potential risk for domestic poultry, pet birds and public health? / vorgelegt von Daniela Zweifel. - Zürich, 2009
Free access at:Related URL. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=006099626

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations