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Comparison of Er:YAG laser and piezoelectric osteotomy: An animal study in sheep


Stübinger, S; Nuss, Katja M; Pongratz, M; Price, J; Sader, R; Zeilhofer, H F; von Rechenberg, Brigitte (2010). Comparison of Er:YAG laser and piezoelectric osteotomy: An animal study in sheep. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, 42(8):743-751.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: It was the aim of this study to compare the feasibility of complete osteotomy of long bones in sheep using a newly designed variable square pulsed Er:YAG laser and piezoelectric surgery. In addition to uneventful bone healing after laser osteotomy, the goal was to assess the possibility to cut thick bony structures with both techniques in a surgically acceptable time frame of 2-3 minutes.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: A tibia midshaft osteotomy was performed in 24 sheep using either an Er:YAG laser (n = 12) or piezoelectric device (n = 12). Laser and piezoelectric groups were divided in two subgroups (n = 6) with sheep sacrificed after 2 and 3 months, respectively. A complete radiological, histological and histomorphometric analysis was performed to compare the course of bone/fracture healing and remodelling.
RESULTS: Laser and piezoelectric osteotomies of the sheep tibia up to a depth of 22 mm were possible without any thermal damage. Radiological and histological results after 2 months showed primary gap healing with distinct periosteal callus formation on the transcortex. After 3 months, radiological and histological analysis revealed less callus formation on the transcortex, with almost no visible osteotomy gap and a distinct formation of lamellar bone crossing the original osteotomy gap.
CONCLUSION: Er:YAG laser osteotomy can successfully be used in long bones with a depth of up to 22 mm, thus challenging the dogma of adverse effects of laser osteotomy due to thermal or other damages

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: It was the aim of this study to compare the feasibility of complete osteotomy of long bones in sheep using a newly designed variable square pulsed Er:YAG laser and piezoelectric surgery. In addition to uneventful bone healing after laser osteotomy, the goal was to assess the possibility to cut thick bony structures with both techniques in a surgically acceptable time frame of 2-3 minutes.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: A tibia midshaft osteotomy was performed in 24 sheep using either an Er:YAG laser (n = 12) or piezoelectric device (n = 12). Laser and piezoelectric groups were divided in two subgroups (n = 6) with sheep sacrificed after 2 and 3 months, respectively. A complete radiological, histological and histomorphometric analysis was performed to compare the course of bone/fracture healing and remodelling.
RESULTS: Laser and piezoelectric osteotomies of the sheep tibia up to a depth of 22 mm were possible without any thermal damage. Radiological and histological results after 2 months showed primary gap healing with distinct periosteal callus formation on the transcortex. After 3 months, radiological and histological analysis revealed less callus formation on the transcortex, with almost no visible osteotomy gap and a distinct formation of lamellar bone crossing the original osteotomy gap.
CONCLUSION: Er:YAG laser osteotomy can successfully be used in long bones with a depth of up to 22 mm, thus challenging the dogma of adverse effects of laser osteotomy due to thermal or other damages

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:11 Feb 2011 14:47
Last Modified:11 May 2016 07:07
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0196-8092
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/lsm.20946
PubMed ID:20886507

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