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Long-term results of vertical rectus muscle transposition and botulinum toxin for sixth nerve palsy


Leiba, H; Wirth, G M; Amstutz, C; Landau, K (2010). Long-term results of vertical rectus muscle transposition and botulinum toxin for sixth nerve palsy. Journal of AAPOS, 14(6):498-501.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To report the long-term outcome of full-tendon vertical rectus muscle transposition combined with chemodenervation of the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle for acquired chronic sixth (abducens) nerve palsy.

METHODS: A retrospective study of all patients treated for severe abduction deficit with transposition plus botulinum toxin over the course of 11 years. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. Main outcome measures were the surgical result and its stability.

RESULTS: A total of 22 patients were included. Mean age at the time of surgery was 41.7 ± 19.1 years (range, 4.5-69). The etiologies for the palsy were head trauma (11), tumor (10), and idiopathic (1). Mean follow-up time was 44.2 ± 37.4 months (range, 12-123). The average distance deviation was 38.1(Δ) ± 11.6(Δ) preoperatively, 4.0(Δ) ± 16.1(Δ) 3 months after the operation (p = 0.0004), and 7.9(Δ) ± 8.8(Δ) at 12 months (p = 0.0003), with no subsequent change. At the final examination, on average 44.2 months after the operation, 13 patients (59%) were within 10(Δ) of alignment, 2 (1%) were overcorrected, and 7 (32%) had vertical deviations. The majority of patients (73%) had no double vision in the primary position. No patient developed anterior segment ischemia.

CONCLUSIONS: Vertical rectus muscle transposition combined with intraoperative botulinum toxin injection into the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle improved alignment in patients with complete chronic sixth nerve palsy. While the effects of treatment may have diminished slightly during the first year after surgery, they remained stable thereafter.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To report the long-term outcome of full-tendon vertical rectus muscle transposition combined with chemodenervation of the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle for acquired chronic sixth (abducens) nerve palsy.

METHODS: A retrospective study of all patients treated for severe abduction deficit with transposition plus botulinum toxin over the course of 11 years. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. Main outcome measures were the surgical result and its stability.

RESULTS: A total of 22 patients were included. Mean age at the time of surgery was 41.7 ± 19.1 years (range, 4.5-69). The etiologies for the palsy were head trauma (11), tumor (10), and idiopathic (1). Mean follow-up time was 44.2 ± 37.4 months (range, 12-123). The average distance deviation was 38.1(Δ) ± 11.6(Δ) preoperatively, 4.0(Δ) ± 16.1(Δ) 3 months after the operation (p = 0.0004), and 7.9(Δ) ± 8.8(Δ) at 12 months (p = 0.0003), with no subsequent change. At the final examination, on average 44.2 months after the operation, 13 patients (59%) were within 10(Δ) of alignment, 2 (1%) were overcorrected, and 7 (32%) had vertical deviations. The majority of patients (73%) had no double vision in the primary position. No patient developed anterior segment ischemia.

CONCLUSIONS: Vertical rectus muscle transposition combined with intraoperative botulinum toxin injection into the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle improved alignment in patients with complete chronic sixth nerve palsy. While the effects of treatment may have diminished slightly during the first year after surgery, they remained stable thereafter.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Ophthalmology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:21 Feb 2011 11:49
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 18:47
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1091-8531
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaapos.2010.09.012
PubMed ID:21094068

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