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Impact of administered bifidobacterium on murine host fatty acid composition - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Wall, R; Ross, R P; Shanahan, F; O'Mahony, L; Kiely, B; Quigley, E; Dinan, T G; Fitzgerald, G; Stanton, C (2010). Impact of administered bifidobacterium on murine host fatty acid composition. Lipids, 45(5):429-436.

Abstract

Recently, we reported that administration of Bifidobacteria resulted in increased concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in murine adipose tissue [1]. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of co-administration of Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 702258 and the substrate for EPA, alpha-linolenic acid, on host fatty acid composition. alpha-Linolenic acid-supplemented diets (1%, wt/wt) were fed to mice (n = 8), with or without B. breve NCIMB 702258 (daily dose of 10(9) microorganisms) for 8 weeks. Two further groups received either supplement of B. breve alone or unsupplemented diet. Tissue fatty acid composition was assessed by gas liquid chromatography. Dietary supplementation of alpha-linolenic acid resulted in higher (P < 0.05) alpha-linolenic acid and EPA concentrations in liver and adipose tissue and lower (P < 0.05) arachidonic acid in liver, adipose tissue and brain compared with mice that did not receive alpha-linolenic acid. Supplementation with B. breve NCIMB 702258 in combination with alpha-linolenic acid resulted in elevated (P < 0.05) liver EPA concentrations compared with alpha-linolenic acid supplementation alone. Furthermore, the former group had higher (P < 0.05) DHA in brain compared with the latter group. These results suggest a role for interactions between fatty acids and commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. This interaction between administered microbes and fatty acids could result in a highly effective nutritional approach to the therapy of a variety of inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions.

PMID: 20405232 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Abstract

Recently, we reported that administration of Bifidobacteria resulted in increased concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in murine adipose tissue [1]. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of co-administration of Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 702258 and the substrate for EPA, alpha-linolenic acid, on host fatty acid composition. alpha-Linolenic acid-supplemented diets (1%, wt/wt) were fed to mice (n = 8), with or without B. breve NCIMB 702258 (daily dose of 10(9) microorganisms) for 8 weeks. Two further groups received either supplement of B. breve alone or unsupplemented diet. Tissue fatty acid composition was assessed by gas liquid chromatography. Dietary supplementation of alpha-linolenic acid resulted in higher (P < 0.05) alpha-linolenic acid and EPA concentrations in liver and adipose tissue and lower (P < 0.05) arachidonic acid in liver, adipose tissue and brain compared with mice that did not receive alpha-linolenic acid. Supplementation with B. breve NCIMB 702258 in combination with alpha-linolenic acid resulted in elevated (P < 0.05) liver EPA concentrations compared with alpha-linolenic acid supplementation alone. Furthermore, the former group had higher (P < 0.05) DHA in brain compared with the latter group. These results suggest a role for interactions between fatty acids and commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. This interaction between administered microbes and fatty acids could result in a highly effective nutritional approach to the therapy of a variety of inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions.

PMID: 20405232 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2010
Deposited On:28 Feb 2011 11:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:50
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0024-4201
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11745-010-3410-7
PubMed ID:20405232

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