Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Potential link between fibropapillomatosis in Hawai'ian marine turtles and non-native algae


Ackermann, M (2011). Potential link between fibropapillomatosis in Hawai'ian marine turtles and non-native algae. PLoS ONE, 5(9):online.

Abstract

The suggested link between fibropapillomatosis (FP) in Hawai'ian marine turtles and non-native macroalgae is indeed very interesting. As mentioned in the Introduction to the present article, FP became a problem for Hawai'ian green turtles only in the 1980s, incidentally when the same problem emerged among marine turtles in Florida. I always wondered how an epidemic could start-off simultaneously at two geographic locations as far apart as Hawai'i and Florida. But then, I stumbled over some statements of Celia M. Smith, Professor of Botany at the University of Hawai’i, who testified on April 15, 2005, regarding the impact of marine invasive algae before the US House of Representatives. Among others, she mentioned that in the 1970s various species of exotic algae were introduced from the Philippines and the Caribbean to Hawai'ian waters. There were both legal and illegal introductions. Most often, the algae were placed in pens on the reef adjacent to the Hawai'ian Institute of Marine Biology in Kaneohe Bay. Citation: "… Water motion in that region was sufficient for parts of the plants to break and be carried off the reef, eventually allowing for the escape of these algae to other regions of Kaneohe Bay. …". Moreover, she mentioned that the red alga Hypnea musciformis, which is specifically mentioned in the present article, readily spread from there to other Hawai'ian islands and posed a particular problem for Maui. (Kaneohe Bay and Maui mentioned in the present article as most highly infested with FP-cases.)

Abstract

The suggested link between fibropapillomatosis (FP) in Hawai'ian marine turtles and non-native macroalgae is indeed very interesting. As mentioned in the Introduction to the present article, FP became a problem for Hawai'ian green turtles only in the 1980s, incidentally when the same problem emerged among marine turtles in Florida. I always wondered how an epidemic could start-off simultaneously at two geographic locations as far apart as Hawai'i and Florida. But then, I stumbled over some statements of Celia M. Smith, Professor of Botany at the University of Hawai’i, who testified on April 15, 2005, regarding the impact of marine invasive algae before the US House of Representatives. Among others, she mentioned that in the 1970s various species of exotic algae were introduced from the Philippines and the Caribbean to Hawai'ian waters. There were both legal and illegal introductions. Most often, the algae were placed in pens on the reef adjacent to the Hawai'ian Institute of Marine Biology in Kaneohe Bay. Citation: "… Water motion in that region was sufficient for parts of the plants to break and be carried off the reef, eventually allowing for the escape of these algae to other regions of Kaneohe Bay. …". Moreover, she mentioned that the red alga Hypnea musciformis, which is specifically mentioned in the present article, readily spread from there to other Hawai'ian islands and posed a particular problem for Maui. (Kaneohe Bay and Maui mentioned in the present article as most highly infested with FP-cases.)

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

208 downloads since deposited on 04 Mar 2011
19 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:04 Mar 2011 14:19
Last Modified:26 Jan 2017 08:49
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1932-6203
Additional Information:Comment
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.111/j.1755-0998.2010.02946.x

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations