Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The shortest of the short: Pericentrin mutations and beyond


Rauch, A (2011). The shortest of the short: Pericentrin mutations and beyond. Best Practice & Research: Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 25(1):125-130.

Abstract

Microcephalic or Majewski's osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) represents the most common type of primordial dwarfism. Adult height is typically about one meter and short stature is becoming mildly disproportionate over time with mild skeletal anomalies. Mental development is usually borderline or within the low normal range but cerebrovascular events that are common in childhood can result in significant cognitive impairment and cerebral palsy. Despite cerebrovascular insults, cardiomyopathy and early onset type 2 diabetes contribute to early mortality and morbidity. Common minor clinical features are truncal obesity, high pitched voice, microdontia and pigmentary changes. MOPD II is caused by autosomal recessive loss of function mutations in the PCNT gene encoding for a key centrosomal protein. There is clinical overlap with the so called Seckel syndrome, a heterogeneous group of entities with at least four different gene loci known to date.

Abstract

Microcephalic or Majewski's osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) represents the most common type of primordial dwarfism. Adult height is typically about one meter and short stature is becoming mildly disproportionate over time with mild skeletal anomalies. Mental development is usually borderline or within the low normal range but cerebrovascular events that are common in childhood can result in significant cognitive impairment and cerebral palsy. Despite cerebrovascular insults, cardiomyopathy and early onset type 2 diabetes contribute to early mortality and morbidity. Common minor clinical features are truncal obesity, high pitched voice, microdontia and pigmentary changes. MOPD II is caused by autosomal recessive loss of function mutations in the PCNT gene encoding for a key centrosomal protein. There is clinical overlap with the so called Seckel syndrome, a heterogeneous group of entities with at least four different gene loci known to date.

Statistics

Citations

20 citations in Web of Science®
21 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 21 Mar 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:21 Mar 2011 08:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:53
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1521-690X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beem.2010.10.015
PubMed ID:21396579

Download