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Extreme polymorphism in a Y-linked sexually selected trait.


Lindholm, A K; Brooks, R; Breden, F (2004). Extreme polymorphism in a Y-linked sexually selected trait. Heredity, 29(3):156-162.

Abstract

Males of the livebearing fish, Poecilia parae, exhibit one of the most complex polymorphisms known to occur within populations, whereas females are monomorphic. We describe five distinct male colour morphs and an associated size dimorphism, and demonstrate through pedigree analysis that the locus or loci controlling the male colour polymorphism is linked to the Y-chromosome. Field surveys from 1999 to 2002 of nine populations in Guyana and Suriname, South America, indicate that some morphs are consistently abundant and others are rare, implying that the colour polymorphism has important fitness consequences. By rearing offspring of field-inseminated females, we showed that the common morph is also the most successful morph in terms of reproduction. However, dichotomous choice tests show that two rare morphs are preferred by females over the common morph. These results suggest that alternative male mating strategies, sperm competition, overt male-male competition, or other processes are overriding female preferences in these populations. Furthermore, Y-linkage of the colour polymorphism in P. parae supports the hypothesis that heterogametic sex chromosomes harbour sexually antagonistic traits beneficial to the heterogametic sex.

Abstract

Males of the livebearing fish, Poecilia parae, exhibit one of the most complex polymorphisms known to occur within populations, whereas females are monomorphic. We describe five distinct male colour morphs and an associated size dimorphism, and demonstrate through pedigree analysis that the locus or loci controlling the male colour polymorphism is linked to the Y-chromosome. Field surveys from 1999 to 2002 of nine populations in Guyana and Suriname, South America, indicate that some morphs are consistently abundant and others are rare, implying that the colour polymorphism has important fitness consequences. By rearing offspring of field-inseminated females, we showed that the common morph is also the most successful morph in terms of reproduction. However, dichotomous choice tests show that two rare morphs are preferred by females over the common morph. These results suggest that alternative male mating strategies, sperm competition, overt male-male competition, or other processes are overriding female preferences in these populations. Furthermore, Y-linkage of the colour polymorphism in P. parae supports the hypothesis that heterogametic sex chromosomes harbour sexually antagonistic traits beneficial to the heterogametic sex.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:1 March 2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:15
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 12:50
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0018-067X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.hdy.6800386
PubMed ID:14735138

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