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HIV interferes with SOCS-1 and -3 expression levels driving immune activation


Miller, R C; Schlaepfer, E; Baenziger, S; Crameri, R; Zeller, S; Byland, R; Audigé, A; Nadal, D; Speck, R F (2011). HIV interferes with SOCS-1 and -3 expression levels driving immune activation. European Journal of Immunology, 41(4):1058-1069.

Abstract

HIV infection is characterized by sustained immune activation, which is reflected by activated T cells and, in particular, by increased levels of phosphorylated STAT proteins. Here, we hypothesized that T-cell activation in HIV infection is partially due to the inability of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 to control the JAK/STAT pathway. We found higher levels of SOCS-1/3 mRNA levels in CD4(+) T cells of HIV-infected patients than in healthy controls. However, SOCS protein levels were lower, explaining the lack of attenuation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Infection of CD4(+) T cells alone did not activate STATs, while ex vivo infection of PBMC did, indicating that non-T cells critical for shaping the immune response, e.g. DC were responsible for the STAT-1 activation. Supernatants from ex vivo-infected PBMC transferred to CD4(+) T cells induced JAK/STAT activation, pointing to a central role of soluble factors. Notably, over-expression of SOCS-1/3 in CD4(+) T cells prevented JAK/STAT activation. Thus, HIV infection interferes with SOCS-1/3 expression driving immune activation. Sustained immune activation disrupts the lymphoid system and favors HIV replication since HIV preferentially infects activated cells. We speculate that regulating SOCS may be a potential way to counteract immune activation in HIV disease.

Abstract

HIV infection is characterized by sustained immune activation, which is reflected by activated T cells and, in particular, by increased levels of phosphorylated STAT proteins. Here, we hypothesized that T-cell activation in HIV infection is partially due to the inability of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 to control the JAK/STAT pathway. We found higher levels of SOCS-1/3 mRNA levels in CD4(+) T cells of HIV-infected patients than in healthy controls. However, SOCS protein levels were lower, explaining the lack of attenuation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Infection of CD4(+) T cells alone did not activate STATs, while ex vivo infection of PBMC did, indicating that non-T cells critical for shaping the immune response, e.g. DC were responsible for the STAT-1 activation. Supernatants from ex vivo-infected PBMC transferred to CD4(+) T cells induced JAK/STAT activation, pointing to a central role of soluble factors. Notably, over-expression of SOCS-1/3 in CD4(+) T cells prevented JAK/STAT activation. Thus, HIV infection interferes with SOCS-1/3 expression driving immune activation. Sustained immune activation disrupts the lymphoid system and favors HIV replication since HIV preferentially infects activated cells. We speculate that regulating SOCS may be a potential way to counteract immune activation in HIV disease.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:30 Mar 2011 14:19
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 08:10
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0014-2980
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/eji.201041198
PubMed ID:21337543

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