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Comparison of indoor and captive, free-roaming management in goldenheaded lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) at Zürich Zoo


Steinmetz, H W; Zingg, R; Ossent, P; Eulenberger, U; Clauss, Marcus; Hatt, J M (2011). Comparison of indoor and captive, free-roaming management in goldenheaded lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) at Zürich Zoo. Animal Welfare, 20(2):205-210.

Abstract

Traditional husbandry practices for the public display of Callitrichidae involve strict separation of animals and public. An important consideration for the evaluation of such management is the occurrence of health problems and potential zoonotic risks. This study compared animal data and veterinary records from a captive, free-roaming population of golden-headed lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) with a population housed under indoor management. The captive, free-roaming group grew significantly faster than the indoor-housed group, as less animals died and offspring were more successfully weaned. No differences in the causes of death were detected between the two husbandry practices. However, bacterial diseases were most common and diagnosed significantly more often under indoor management. This study suggests that the captive, free-roaming management of golden-headed lion tamarins can be conducive to increased reproductive success, improved health and improved welfare. Therefore, current husbandry recommendations for captive, free-roaming conditions were supported by the findings of the present study as a valuable housing practice where health regulations and proper husbandry parameters permit.

Abstract

Traditional husbandry practices for the public display of Callitrichidae involve strict separation of animals and public. An important consideration for the evaluation of such management is the occurrence of health problems and potential zoonotic risks. This study compared animal data and veterinary records from a captive, free-roaming population of golden-headed lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) with a population housed under indoor management. The captive, free-roaming group grew significantly faster than the indoor-housed group, as less animals died and offspring were more successfully weaned. No differences in the causes of death were detected between the two husbandry practices. However, bacterial diseases were most common and diagnosed significantly more often under indoor management. This study suggests that the captive, free-roaming management of golden-headed lion tamarins can be conducive to increased reproductive success, improved health and improved welfare. Therefore, current husbandry recommendations for captive, free-roaming conditions were supported by the findings of the present study as a valuable housing practice where health regulations and proper husbandry parameters permit.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:06 Jun 2011 10:34
Last Modified:17 Sep 2017 05:16
Publisher:Universities Federation for Animal Welfare
ISSN:0962-7286
Official URL:http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ufaw/aw/2011/00000020/00000002/art00008

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