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The Stench of Sin: Reflections from Jain and Buddhist texts


Granoff, P (2011). The Stench of Sin: Reflections from Jain and Buddhist texts. Asiatische Studien / Etudes Asiatiques, 65(1):45-63.

Abstract

This article focuses on a recurring metaphor for sin in a range of Jain and Buddhist texts. Sin is seen as something physically disgusting and stinking. It is frequently compared to excrement. Descriptions of the human body, which also often stress its foul odor, suggest its invariable connection with sin. The paper concludes with some discussion about the “pure” bodies of perfected individuals, which are more like the bodies of animals than of humans.

Abstract

This article focuses on a recurring metaphor for sin in a range of Jain and Buddhist texts. Sin is seen as something physically disgusting and stinking. It is frequently compared to excrement. Descriptions of the human body, which also often stress its foul odor, suggest its invariable connection with sin. The paper concludes with some discussion about the “pure” bodies of perfected individuals, which are more like the bodies of animals than of humans.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:Journals > Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques
Journals > Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques > Archive > 65 (2011) > 1
Dewey Decimal Classification:950 History of Asia
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:21 Jun 2011 16:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:56
Publisher:Schweizerische Asiengesellschaft / Verlag Peter Lang
ISSN:0004-4717

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