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Revenge phenomena and posttraumatic stress disorder in former East German political prisoners


Gäbler, I; Maercker, Andreas (2011). Revenge phenomena and posttraumatic stress disorder in former East German political prisoners. The Journal of nervous and mental disease, 199(5):287-294.

Abstract

To date, psychological revenge phenomena have not been investigated systematically as factors potentially contributing to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This follow-up study (1995: N = 146; 2008: N = 93) assessed the predictive power of revenge phenomena for current PTSD symptoms in a sample of former East German political prisoners some four decades after traumatization. As the results of multiple hierarchical regression analyses have revealed, revenge feelings and cognitions significantly contributed to the prediction of both self-reported and clinician-rated PTSD symptoms above and beyond standard predictor variables. In contrast, revenge intentions did not contribute to the prediction of current PTSD. The findings suggest that revenge feelings and cognitions may be a maintaining factor for longtime PTSD. Identification and therapeutic modification of dysfunctional revenge phenomena may therefore enhance the effectiveness of psychotherapy for persistent PTSD.

Abstract

To date, psychological revenge phenomena have not been investigated systematically as factors potentially contributing to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This follow-up study (1995: N = 146; 2008: N = 93) assessed the predictive power of revenge phenomena for current PTSD symptoms in a sample of former East German political prisoners some four decades after traumatization. As the results of multiple hierarchical regression analyses have revealed, revenge feelings and cognitions significantly contributed to the prediction of both self-reported and clinician-rated PTSD symptoms above and beyond standard predictor variables. In contrast, revenge intentions did not contribute to the prediction of current PTSD. The findings suggest that revenge feelings and cognitions may be a maintaining factor for longtime PTSD. Identification and therapeutic modification of dysfunctional revenge phenomena may therefore enhance the effectiveness of psychotherapy for persistent PTSD.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2011
Deposited On:13 Jul 2011 10:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:57
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0022-3018
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0b013e3182174fe7
PubMed ID:21543946

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