Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The ins and outs of mycobacterium tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing: Themed review 'Therapeutic efficiency in the presence of resistance mechanisms: (when) to give-or not to give?'


Böttger, E C (2011). The ins and outs of mycobacterium tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing: Themed review 'Therapeutic efficiency in the presence of resistance mechanisms: (when) to give-or not to give?'. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 17(8):1128-1134.

Abstract

Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the diagnostic laboratory classifies clinical isolates as either drug-'resistant' or drug-'susceptible', on the basis of their ability to grow in the presence of a 'critical concentration' of the test compound. From knowledge of the mechanisms that underlie drug resistance, it has become evident that drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is quite heterogeneous and involves low-level, moderate-level and high-level drug resistance phenotypes. Different mutations are associated with different levels of phenotypic resistance, and the acquisition of a genetic alteration leading to a decrease in drug susceptibility does not inevitably exclude the affected compound from treatment regimens. As a result, the simple categorization of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates as 'resistant' on the basis of susceptibility testing at 'critical concentrations' may need to be revised and supplemented by quantitative measures of resistance testing to reflect the biological complexity of drug resistance, with the view of optimally exploiting the compounds available for treatment.

Abstract

Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the diagnostic laboratory classifies clinical isolates as either drug-'resistant' or drug-'susceptible', on the basis of their ability to grow in the presence of a 'critical concentration' of the test compound. From knowledge of the mechanisms that underlie drug resistance, it has become evident that drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is quite heterogeneous and involves low-level, moderate-level and high-level drug resistance phenotypes. Different mutations are associated with different levels of phenotypic resistance, and the acquisition of a genetic alteration leading to a decrease in drug susceptibility does not inevitably exclude the affected compound from treatment regimens. As a result, the simple categorization of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates as 'resistant' on the basis of susceptibility testing at 'critical concentrations' may need to be revised and supplemented by quantitative measures of resistance testing to reflect the biological complexity of drug resistance, with the view of optimally exploiting the compounds available for treatment.

Statistics

Citations

51 citations in Web of Science®
54 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:22 Jul 2011 12:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:57
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1198-743X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2011.03551.x
PubMed ID:21631641

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations