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Tail amputation for treatment of osteomyelitis of the first and second coccygeal vertebrae in a cow


Nuss, Karl; Feist, M (2011). Tail amputation for treatment of osteomyelitis of the first and second coccygeal vertebrae in a cow. Tierärztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere, 39(3):176-178.

Abstract

Diseases of the tail are common in cattle (3, 4). Infection or necrosis of the tail tip, injury of the coccygeal vertebrae resulting in tail paralysis (8, 12) as well as fracture or luxation of the coccygeal vertebrae(6) are some of the most common disorders. Congenital defects, diskospondylitis and tumours of the tail occur occasionally (5, 8). Tail fractures or luxations are usually the result of trauma, such as falls, excessive traction on the tail when moving a downer cow, excessive traction on a calf during assisted delivery, and mounting by other cows or heavy bulls (3, 13). Clinical signs depend on the severity of nerve damage and the location of the fracture. Fractures involving the second (S2), third and fourth sacral (S3 and S4) segments may affect the pudendal nerve, pelvic nerves and the tail nerve resulting in paralysis of the urinary bladder, anus and tail. Tail paralysis without other neurological deficits indicates damage to the coccygeal nerve (7). Diseases of the tail may be treated conservatively or by amputation cranial to the affected area. Tail amputation in cattle is a very controversial subject because in some countries, it is carried out prophylactically for management reasons without any medical indication (1, 9, 11). Prophylactic tail amputation is done 7–8 cm below the vulva in calves and 5–6 cm below the vulva in heifers and mature cows. The present case report describes complete amputation of the tail at the level of the sacrum in a cow with osteomye - litis of the first (C1) and second coccygeal (C2) vertebrae.

Abstract

Diseases of the tail are common in cattle (3, 4). Infection or necrosis of the tail tip, injury of the coccygeal vertebrae resulting in tail paralysis (8, 12) as well as fracture or luxation of the coccygeal vertebrae(6) are some of the most common disorders. Congenital defects, diskospondylitis and tumours of the tail occur occasionally (5, 8). Tail fractures or luxations are usually the result of trauma, such as falls, excessive traction on the tail when moving a downer cow, excessive traction on a calf during assisted delivery, and mounting by other cows or heavy bulls (3, 13). Clinical signs depend on the severity of nerve damage and the location of the fracture. Fractures involving the second (S2), third and fourth sacral (S3 and S4) segments may affect the pudendal nerve, pelvic nerves and the tail nerve resulting in paralysis of the urinary bladder, anus and tail. Tail paralysis without other neurological deficits indicates damage to the coccygeal nerve (7). Diseases of the tail may be treated conservatively or by amputation cranial to the affected area. Tail amputation in cattle is a very controversial subject because in some countries, it is carried out prophylactically for management reasons without any medical indication (1, 9, 11). Prophylactic tail amputation is done 7–8 cm below the vulva in calves and 5–6 cm below the vulva in heifers and mature cows. The present case report describes complete amputation of the tail at the level of the sacrum in a cow with osteomye - litis of the first (C1) and second coccygeal (C2) vertebrae.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:27 Jul 2011 12:32
Last Modified:04 May 2016 16:18
Publisher:Schattauer
ISSN:1434-1220
Additional Information:Dieser Artikel ist nicht genau identisch mit dem Original, das in Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe G veröffentlicht wurde. Die überarbeitete und veröffentlichte Version von Nuss, K; Feist, M (2011). Tail amputation for treatment of osteomyelitis of the first and second coccygeal vertebrae in a cow. Tierärztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere, 3(39)176-178 ist online unter http://www.schattauer.de/en/magazine/subject-areas/journals-a-z/tieraerztliche-praxis-grosstiere/contents/archive.html erhältlich.
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.schattauer.de/index.php?id=5236&mid=16219
PubMed ID:22138803

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