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Antibodies against beta-amyloid slow cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease


Hock, C; Konietzko, U; Streffer, J R; Tracy, J; Signorell, A; Müller-Tillmanns, B; Lemke, U; Henke, K; Moritz, E; Garcia, E; Wollmer, M A; Umbricht, D; de Quervain, D J F; Hofmann, M; Maddalena, A; Papassotiropoulos, A; Nitsch, R M (2003). Antibodies against beta-amyloid slow cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. Neuron, 38(4):547-554.

Abstract

To test whether antibodies against beta-amyloid are effective in slowing progression of Alzheimer's disease, we assessed cognitive functions in 30 patients who received a prime and a booster immunization of aggregated Abeta(42) over a 1 year period in a placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Twenty patients generated antibodies against beta-amyloid, as determined by tissue amyloid plaque immunoreactivity assay. Patients who generated such antibodies showed significantly slower rates of decline of cognitive functions and activities of daily living, as indicated by the Mini Mental State Examination, the Disability Assessment for Dementia, and the Visual Paired Associates Test of delayed recall from the Wechsler Memory Scale, as compared to patients without such antibodies. These beneficial clinical effects were also present in two of three patients who had experienced transient episodes of immunization-related aseptic meningoencephalitis. Our results establish that antibodies against beta-amyloid plaques can slow cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

Abstract

To test whether antibodies against beta-amyloid are effective in slowing progression of Alzheimer's disease, we assessed cognitive functions in 30 patients who received a prime and a booster immunization of aggregated Abeta(42) over a 1 year period in a placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Twenty patients generated antibodies against beta-amyloid, as determined by tissue amyloid plaque immunoreactivity assay. Patients who generated such antibodies showed significantly slower rates of decline of cognitive functions and activities of daily living, as indicated by the Mini Mental State Examination, the Disability Assessment for Dementia, and the Visual Paired Associates Test of delayed recall from the Wechsler Memory Scale, as compared to patients without such antibodies. These beneficial clinical effects were also present in two of three patients who had experienced transient episodes of immunization-related aseptic meningoencephalitis. Our results establish that antibodies against beta-amyloid plaques can slow cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2003
Deposited On:02 Sep 2011 06:34
Last Modified:16 Aug 2016 10:15
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0896-6273
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0896-6273(03)00294-0
PubMed ID:12765607

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