Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Begehrt das Herz Bergluft? Einfluss der Meereshöhe auf das Herz-Kreislauf-Risiko


Faeh, David (2011). Begehrt das Herz Bergluft? Einfluss der Meereshöhe auf das Herz-Kreislauf-Risiko. Praxis, 100(18):1107-1113.

Abstract

Gemäss den meisten Studien haben Menschen, die in der Höhe leben oder dort geboren sind, ein niedrigeres Risiko an einem Herz- oder Gehirninfarkt zu sterben als Flachländer.
Dabei ist der Höheneffekt ausgeprägter für Herz-, als für Hirnschlag und generell stärker bei Männern als bei Frauen. Möglicherweise beeinflusst die Exposition an einer gewissen Meereshöhe das Herz-Kreislauf-Risiko ein Leben lang. Dass Unterschiede bei den klassischenHerz-Kreislauf-Risikofaktoren für den Höheneffekt verantwortlich sind, ist unwahrscheinlich. Hingegen könnten höhenabhängige Umweltbedingungen eine Rolle spielen.

According to most studies, persons living or being born at higher altitude have a lower risk of fatal myocardial infarction or stroke than lowlanders. The altitude effect is more pronounced for myocardial infarction than for stroke and generally stronger in men than in women. Possibly, exposure to a certain altitude impacts on cardiovascular risk for the entire life span. It is unlikely that classical cardiovascular risk factors substantially influence the altitude effect. In contrast, environmental conditions that depend on altitude could play a role.

Abstract

Gemäss den meisten Studien haben Menschen, die in der Höhe leben oder dort geboren sind, ein niedrigeres Risiko an einem Herz- oder Gehirninfarkt zu sterben als Flachländer.
Dabei ist der Höheneffekt ausgeprägter für Herz-, als für Hirnschlag und generell stärker bei Männern als bei Frauen. Möglicherweise beeinflusst die Exposition an einer gewissen Meereshöhe das Herz-Kreislauf-Risiko ein Leben lang. Dass Unterschiede bei den klassischenHerz-Kreislauf-Risikofaktoren für den Höheneffekt verantwortlich sind, ist unwahrscheinlich. Hingegen könnten höhenabhängige Umweltbedingungen eine Rolle spielen.

According to most studies, persons living or being born at higher altitude have a lower risk of fatal myocardial infarction or stroke than lowlanders. The altitude effect is more pronounced for myocardial infarction than for stroke and generally stronger in men than in women. Possibly, exposure to a certain altitude impacts on cardiovascular risk for the entire life span. It is unlikely that classical cardiovascular risk factors substantially influence the altitude effect. In contrast, environmental conditions that depend on altitude could play a role.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 27 Sep 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Other titles:Does the heart desire mountain air? Impact of altitude on cardiovascular risk
Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2011
Deposited On:27 Sep 2011 07:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:01
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:1661-8157
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/1661-8157/a000656
PubMed ID:21932199

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 2MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations