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News sensitivity and the cross-section of stock returns


Dzielinski, Michal (2011). News sensitivity and the cross-section of stock returns. NCCR FINRISK 719, University of Zurich.

Abstract

The paper is the first one outside the high-frequency domain to use sentiment-signed news to directly compare news and no-news stock returns. This is done by estimating
whether returns on positive, neutral and negative news days are significantly different from the average daily return for a large sample of US stocks over the period from
January 2003 to August 2010. The general results show that positive news days indeed have above-average returns and negative news days returns are below average, while the neutral news days are economically barely distinguishable from the average. The market also proves to be fast and accurate at pricing new information, as there are no signs of drift shortly after news days. On the contrary, a directionally correct and statistically significant movement can be found on the day before the news day. The cross-sectional analysis reveals significant differences in the strength of market reactions between stocks ranked on size, book-to-market or news coverage. The general results however hold across all subsamples and are also not driven by earnings announcements or past stock returns. Moreover, the average news sensitivity is itself a priced source of risk. A portfolio of stocks with high sensitivity to news outperforms a portfolio of stocks with low sensitivity by a statistically and economically significant 0.84% per
month. This news premium seems to primarily relate to the high impact of news in situations of general uncertainty.

Abstract

The paper is the first one outside the high-frequency domain to use sentiment-signed news to directly compare news and no-news stock returns. This is done by estimating
whether returns on positive, neutral and negative news days are significantly different from the average daily return for a large sample of US stocks over the period from
January 2003 to August 2010. The general results show that positive news days indeed have above-average returns and negative news days returns are below average, while the neutral news days are economically barely distinguishable from the average. The market also proves to be fast and accurate at pricing new information, as there are no signs of drift shortly after news days. On the contrary, a directionally correct and statistically significant movement can be found on the day before the news day. The cross-sectional analysis reveals significant differences in the strength of market reactions between stocks ranked on size, book-to-market or news coverage. The general results however hold across all subsamples and are also not driven by earnings announcements or past stock returns. Moreover, the average news sensitivity is itself a priced source of risk. A portfolio of stocks with high sensitivity to news outperforms a portfolio of stocks with low sensitivity by a statistically and economically significant 0.84% per
month. This news premium seems to primarily relate to the high impact of news in situations of general uncertainty.

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Citations

16 citations in Microsoft Academic

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Banking and Finance
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
JEL Classification:C33, G12
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:27 Sep 2011 09:02
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 13:39
Series Name:NCCR FINRISK
OA Status:Green
Official URL:http://ssrn.com/abstract=1889030

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