Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Highly asymmetric fine-scale genetic structure between sexes of African striped mice and indication for condition dependent alternative male dispersal tactics


Solmsen, N; Johannesen, J; Schradin, C (2011). Highly asymmetric fine-scale genetic structure between sexes of African striped mice and indication for condition dependent alternative male dispersal tactics. Molecular Ecology, 20(8):1624-1634.

Abstract

Sex-biased dispersal is observed in many taxa, but few studies have compared sex-biased dispersal among and within populations. We addressed the magnitude and habitat dependency of sex-biased dispersal in social African striped mice by separating group-related from population-related genetic variance to understand the contribution of each sex to deme structure. As dispersal over unoccupied habitat is likely to be more costly than dispersal within a population, we predicted that individuals leaving the natal population have a lower body condition, being inferior to heavier territorial individuals. Fine-scale genetic structure was detected in both sexes. Female relatedness decreased continuously from R = 0.21 at 25m to zero at 500m. Maximum male relatedness R = 0.05 was constant at distances between 25-75m, becoming zero at 100m. Genetic variance (FST) among seven locations was significantly higher in females than in males, while inbreeding estimates (FIS) were significantly higher in males than in females. Assignment tests estimated significantly more migrants among males, while Bayesian clustering estimated only a single genetic unit cluster for males among the seven locations. The mean body mass of migrant males (44g) was significantly lower than for males that remained resident and thus dispersed within their sub-population (48g). Combined, the results showed habitat-independent male-biased dispersal and high female philopatry, and suggested that body condition was more important than kinship in male dispersal decisions. We suggest that locally inferior males are important for gene flow between sub-populations. Thus, males might follow alternative dispersal tactics.

Abstract

Sex-biased dispersal is observed in many taxa, but few studies have compared sex-biased dispersal among and within populations. We addressed the magnitude and habitat dependency of sex-biased dispersal in social African striped mice by separating group-related from population-related genetic variance to understand the contribution of each sex to deme structure. As dispersal over unoccupied habitat is likely to be more costly than dispersal within a population, we predicted that individuals leaving the natal population have a lower body condition, being inferior to heavier territorial individuals. Fine-scale genetic structure was detected in both sexes. Female relatedness decreased continuously from R = 0.21 at 25m to zero at 500m. Maximum male relatedness R = 0.05 was constant at distances between 25-75m, becoming zero at 100m. Genetic variance (FST) among seven locations was significantly higher in females than in males, while inbreeding estimates (FIS) were significantly higher in males than in females. Assignment tests estimated significantly more migrants among males, while Bayesian clustering estimated only a single genetic unit cluster for males among the seven locations. The mean body mass of migrant males (44g) was significantly lower than for males that remained resident and thus dispersed within their sub-population (48g). Combined, the results showed habitat-independent male-biased dispersal and high female philopatry, and suggested that body condition was more important than kinship in male dispersal decisions. We suggest that locally inferior males are important for gene flow between sub-populations. Thus, males might follow alternative dispersal tactics.

Statistics

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 27 Sep 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:27 Sep 2011 10:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0962-1083
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05042.x
PubMed ID:21366749

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 2MB
View at publisher