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Salivary amino acid concentrations in zebus (Bos indicus) and zebu hybrids (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) fed a tannin-rich diet


Yisehak, K; Becker, A; Belay, D; Bosch, G; Hendriks, W H; Clauss, Marcus; Janssens, G P J (2011). Salivary amino acid concentrations in zebus (Bos indicus) and zebu hybrids (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) fed a tannin-rich diet. Belgian Journal of Zoology, 141(2):93-96.

Abstract

Many animals show adaptation to tannins in the form of tannin-binding salivary proteins (1). Among ruminants, such proteins have been demonstrated in saliva of several species (usually browsers and intermediate feeders) (2, 3, 4, 13). There is some circumstantial evidence to suggest that zebu cattle (Bos indicus) are different from temperate cattle breeds with respect to their salivary and digestive physiology. Apart from differences in susceptibility to heat and tropical disease (5), a difference in salivary anti-tannin defenses (and a resulting difference in rumen physiology) could be another reason zebu cattle are particularly suited for agricultural systems in the tropics, where available forages often contain high levels of tannins (6, 7). Although non-proline-rich proteins exist that also have affinity for tannins (1, 8), it is interesting to compare the proline content of different cattle breeds. Here, we report such a screening for a comparison of zebu cattle and zebu-Holstein- Friesian in the Jimma area located at 7°40′N and 36°50′E at 1760 masl in southwest Ethiopia.

Abstract

Many animals show adaptation to tannins in the form of tannin-binding salivary proteins (1). Among ruminants, such proteins have been demonstrated in saliva of several species (usually browsers and intermediate feeders) (2, 3, 4, 13). There is some circumstantial evidence to suggest that zebu cattle (Bos indicus) are different from temperate cattle breeds with respect to their salivary and digestive physiology. Apart from differences in susceptibility to heat and tropical disease (5), a difference in salivary anti-tannin defenses (and a resulting difference in rumen physiology) could be another reason zebu cattle are particularly suited for agricultural systems in the tropics, where available forages often contain high levels of tannins (6, 7). Although non-proline-rich proteins exist that also have affinity for tannins (1, 8), it is interesting to compare the proline content of different cattle breeds. Here, we report such a screening for a comparison of zebu cattle and zebu-Holstein- Friesian in the Jimma area located at 7°40′N and 36°50′E at 1760 masl in southwest Ethiopia.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:25 Oct 2011 12:26
Last Modified:10 May 2018 04:28
Publisher:Societe Royale Zoologique de Belgique
ISSN:0777-6276
OA Status:Green
Related URLs:http://www.naturalsciences.be/institute/associations/rbzs_website/bjz
Project Information:
  • : FunderVLIR-UOS institutional university cooperation (IUC)
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title

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