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Relationship between time-based work-life conflict and burnout


Brauchli, Rebecca; Bauer, Georg F; Hämmig, Oliver (2011). Relationship between time-based work-life conflict and burnout. Swiss Journal of Psychology, 70(3):165-174.

Abstract

This study investigates whether and how time-based work-to-life conflict and time-based life-to-work conflict are related to burnout among Swiss employees. The sample consisted of 6,091 female and male employees of four large-scale Swiss enterprises in various economic sectors (healthcare, banking, insurance, and logistics) and occupational groups (bankers, insurance company employees, nurses, physicians, technical staff, administrative staff, baggage handlers, etc.). Participants completed an extensive questionnaire relating to specific work and general life conditions, the integration of work and private life, health, and socioeconomic factors. Employees reported greater time-based work-to-life conflict than time-based life-to-work conflict. Regression analyses indicated that time-based work-to-life conflict appeared to be strongly associated with burnout. Time-based life-to-work conflict seems to be a weaker, but equally significant predictor of burnout. The present study contributes to the research literature on work-life conflict in Switzerland and its association with burnout. Since the results suggest a strong association between time-based work-to-life conflict and burnout, intervention strategies that help to mitigate such conflict may also reduce burnout

Abstract

This study investigates whether and how time-based work-to-life conflict and time-based life-to-work conflict are related to burnout among Swiss employees. The sample consisted of 6,091 female and male employees of four large-scale Swiss enterprises in various economic sectors (healthcare, banking, insurance, and logistics) and occupational groups (bankers, insurance company employees, nurses, physicians, technical staff, administrative staff, baggage handlers, etc.). Participants completed an extensive questionnaire relating to specific work and general life conditions, the integration of work and private life, health, and socioeconomic factors. Employees reported greater time-based work-to-life conflict than time-based life-to-work conflict. Regression analyses indicated that time-based work-to-life conflict appeared to be strongly associated with burnout. Time-based life-to-work conflict seems to be a weaker, but equally significant predictor of burnout. The present study contributes to the research literature on work-life conflict in Switzerland and its association with burnout. Since the results suggest a strong association between time-based work-to-life conflict and burnout, intervention strategies that help to mitigate such conflict may also reduce burnout

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14 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:25 Oct 2011 12:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:03
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:1421-0185
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/1421-0185/a000052

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