Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Synaptic plasticity and dysconnection in schizophrenia


Stephan, K E; Baldeweg, T; Friston, K J (2006). Synaptic plasticity and dysconnection in schizophrenia. Biological Psychiatry, 59(10):929-939.

Abstract

Current pathophysiological theories of schizophrenia highlight the role of altered brain connectivity. This dysconnectivity could manifest 1) anatomically, through structural changes of association fibers at the cellular level, and/or 2) functionally, through aberrant control of synaptic plasticity at the synaptic level. In this article, we review the evidence for these theories, focusing on the modulation of synaptic plasticity. In particular, we discuss how dysconnectivity, observed between brain regions in schizophrenic patients, could result from abnormal modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-dependent plasticity by other neurotransmitter systems. We focus on the implication of the dysconnection hypothesis for functional imaging at the systems level. In particular, we review recent advances in measuring plasticity in the human brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) that can be used to address dysconnectivity in schizophrenia. Promising experimental paradigms include perceptual and reinforcement learning. We describe how theoretical and causal models of brain responses might contribute to a mechanistic understanding of synaptic plasticity in schizophrenia.

Abstract

Current pathophysiological theories of schizophrenia highlight the role of altered brain connectivity. This dysconnectivity could manifest 1) anatomically, through structural changes of association fibers at the cellular level, and/or 2) functionally, through aberrant control of synaptic plasticity at the synaptic level. In this article, we review the evidence for these theories, focusing on the modulation of synaptic plasticity. In particular, we discuss how dysconnectivity, observed between brain regions in schizophrenic patients, could result from abnormal modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-dependent plasticity by other neurotransmitter systems. We focus on the implication of the dysconnection hypothesis for functional imaging at the systems level. In particular, we review recent advances in measuring plasticity in the human brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) that can be used to address dysconnectivity in schizophrenia. Promising experimental paradigms include perceptual and reinforcement learning. We describe how theoretical and causal models of brain responses might contribute to a mechanistic understanding of synaptic plasticity in schizophrenia.

Statistics

Citations

448 citations in Web of Science®
485 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 31 Oct 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
08 University Research Priority Programs > Foundations of Human Social Behavior: Altruism and Egoism
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:31 Oct 2011 11:55
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 09:24
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0006-3223
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2005.10.005
PubMed ID:16427028

Download