Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Schooling as a means of popular Education. Pestalozzi’s method as a popular education experiment


Horlacher, R (2011). Schooling as a means of popular Education. Pestalozzi’s method as a popular education experiment. Paedagogica Historica, 47(1-2):65-75.

Abstract

Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi promised his Method as a means of education for all that was easily manageable by mothers at home for early childhood, leading eventually to a wholesome person characterised by morality. In order to develop this Method, Pestalozzi published “Wie Gertrud ihre Kinder lehrt” (How Gertrud Teaches her Children) in 1801 and then his so‐called Elementary Books, especially the "Buch der Mütter” (Books for Mothers) in 1803. However, not only was home education to be reformed, but also the subsequent education in school. For this purpose Pestalozzi erected his institutes in Burgdorf, Münchenbuchsee, and Yverdon and fostered the publication of teaching manuals. The Method was advertised in the language of redemption for all. This article examines to what extent the promises made by Pestalozzi and his colleagues in his Institutes covered the interests of the consumers outside the Institutes. What was it that the parents of the students expected from the education in the Institutes? Were these expectations compatible with the promises made by the Method and its creator? Why exactly were the students sent to Burgdorf, Münchenbuchsee and Yverdon? How did the parents react to the gap between promise and reality? And to what extent were Pestalozzi's efforts an attempt at popular enlightenment?

Abstract

Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi promised his Method as a means of education for all that was easily manageable by mothers at home for early childhood, leading eventually to a wholesome person characterised by morality. In order to develop this Method, Pestalozzi published “Wie Gertrud ihre Kinder lehrt” (How Gertrud Teaches her Children) in 1801 and then his so‐called Elementary Books, especially the "Buch der Mütter” (Books for Mothers) in 1803. However, not only was home education to be reformed, but also the subsequent education in school. For this purpose Pestalozzi erected his institutes in Burgdorf, Münchenbuchsee, and Yverdon and fostered the publication of teaching manuals. The Method was advertised in the language of redemption for all. This article examines to what extent the promises made by Pestalozzi and his colleagues in his Institutes covered the interests of the consumers outside the Institutes. What was it that the parents of the students expected from the education in the Institutes? Were these expectations compatible with the promises made by the Method and its creator? Why exactly were the students sent to Burgdorf, Münchenbuchsee and Yverdon? How did the parents react to the gap between promise and reality? And to what extent were Pestalozzi's efforts an attempt at popular enlightenment?

Statistics

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:28 Oct 2011 08:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:04
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0030-9230
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/00309230.2010.530286

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations