Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Genetic characterisation of canine and equine papillomaviruses and papillomatoses


Lange, C E. Genetic characterisation of canine and equine papillomaviruses and papillomatoses. 2011, University of Zurich, Faculty of Science.

Abstract

Papillomaviruses can infect epithelia of humans and animals, resulting in most cases in asymptomatic infections. However many benign and several malignant disorders were shown to result from papillomavirus infections. Many different papillomaviruses have been described, most of them infecting humans. Animals have their own papillomaviruses but relatively few animal papillomaviruses are characterized or known at all. Even in common domestic animals, like the dog and the horse only one papillomavirus each had been studied in some detail in the past. This study was consequently initiated to shed more light onto the papillomavirus situation in these two species and to establish viable tools for this purpose. We were able to identify novel canine papillomaviruses (CPVs) associated with distinct clinical conditions. The DNA genomes from some of these viruses were cloned and sequenced. We found, that histologically distinct types of inverted papillomas seem to be associated with the
presence of DNA belonging to different CPVs. Sequence analyses of newly cloned CPV genomes revealed that these genomes belonged to the papillomavirus genera Lambda, Tau and Chi. This phylogenetic characterization was supported by analysis of other features, such as genome organization and genome size. Some clinical-pathological characteristics were also reflected in this categorization, above all the finding that all CPVs inducing pigmented plaques belonged to the Chi papillomavirus genus. Based on a careful evaluation of PCR assays it was possible to show that viral DNA could be detected in the clinically healthy tissue from oral mucosa and interdigital skin of dogs. As a first step towards developing a tool for future research on the mechanisms of virus cell interaction, we have in addition generated keratinocyte cell lines harboring and transcribing the DNA of CPV1, CPV3 or CPV5
respectively. We also conducted a related project on horse papillomaviruses. In the horse papillomatoses are a well known problem and have already been described in ancient times.
Curiously, the best known papillomavirus affecting horses so far is a bovine papillomavirus, BPV1, involved in the equine sarcoid. In this project, we identified equine papillomaviruses (EcPVs) in two other occasionally observed disorders, namely penile papillomas and aural plaques. We established PCR and in situ hybridisations and showed that samples of penile papillomas from the histological archive were positive for either of two described variants of EcPV2. Viral DNA was located in the nuclei of koilocytes, cells typical for active viral infection in the skin. This test might help in the molecular classification of equine papillomatoses.

Abstract

Papillomaviruses can infect epithelia of humans and animals, resulting in most cases in asymptomatic infections. However many benign and several malignant disorders were shown to result from papillomavirus infections. Many different papillomaviruses have been described, most of them infecting humans. Animals have their own papillomaviruses but relatively few animal papillomaviruses are characterized or known at all. Even in common domestic animals, like the dog and the horse only one papillomavirus each had been studied in some detail in the past. This study was consequently initiated to shed more light onto the papillomavirus situation in these two species and to establish viable tools for this purpose. We were able to identify novel canine papillomaviruses (CPVs) associated with distinct clinical conditions. The DNA genomes from some of these viruses were cloned and sequenced. We found, that histologically distinct types of inverted papillomas seem to be associated with the
presence of DNA belonging to different CPVs. Sequence analyses of newly cloned CPV genomes revealed that these genomes belonged to the papillomavirus genera Lambda, Tau and Chi. This phylogenetic characterization was supported by analysis of other features, such as genome organization and genome size. Some clinical-pathological characteristics were also reflected in this categorization, above all the finding that all CPVs inducing pigmented plaques belonged to the Chi papillomavirus genus. Based on a careful evaluation of PCR assays it was possible to show that viral DNA could be detected in the clinically healthy tissue from oral mucosa and interdigital skin of dogs. As a first step towards developing a tool for future research on the mechanisms of virus cell interaction, we have in addition generated keratinocyte cell lines harboring and transcribing the DNA of CPV1, CPV3 or CPV5
respectively. We also conducted a related project on horse papillomaviruses. In the horse papillomatoses are a well known problem and have already been described in ancient times.
Curiously, the best known papillomavirus affecting horses so far is a bovine papillomavirus, BPV1, involved in the equine sarcoid. In this project, we identified equine papillomaviruses (EcPVs) in two other occasionally observed disorders, namely penile papillomas and aural plaques. We established PCR and in situ hybridisations and showed that samples of penile papillomas from the histological archive were positive for either of two described variants of EcPV2. Viral DNA was located in the nuclei of koilocytes, cells typical for active viral infection in the skin. This test might help in the molecular classification of equine papillomatoses.

Statistics

Downloads

304 downloads since deposited on 07 Nov 2011
43 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Greber U F, Favrot C, Fraefel C, Teifke J P, Hennet T
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Virology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:07 Nov 2011 12:28
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 09:29
Number of Pages:96

Download

Download PDF  'Genetic characterisation of canine and equine papillomaviruses and papillomatoses'.
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 39MB