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ALS patients with SOD1 mutations in Switzerland show very diverse phenotypes and extremely long survival


Weber, M; Neuwirth, C; Thierbach, J; Schweikert, K; Czaplinski, A; Petersen, J; Jung, H H; Birve, A; Marklund, S L; Andersen, P M (2012). ALS patients with SOD1 mutations in Switzerland show very diverse phenotypes and extremely long survival. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, 83(3):351-353.

Abstract

Introduction: Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) is recognised as a heterogeneous syndrome with mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene being the most frequently identified cause of ALS. Interfamily and intrafamily phenotypic variability have been associated with some SOD1 mutations but not with other mutations.1 2 We prospectively screened sporadic ALS and FALS patients from Switzerland for SOD1 mutations and followed their clinical course.

Methods: With written informed consent and approval by the local ethical review boards, blood was drawn from 257 patients and from 245 Swiss blood donors matched for ethnicity, age and gender. Forty-seven of the patients had one or more affected blood relatives within three generations and were classified as FALS. SOD1 analysis was performed in Sweden as described.1

Results: Nine patients from seven unrelated families carried a SOD1 mutation (table 1), including three novel mutations (V5L, L144F (TTG→TTT) and E78insSI (c.240-7T→G)). Among the controls, a single individual was found to be heterozygous for a silent mutation A140A.

Abstract

Introduction: Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) is recognised as a heterogeneous syndrome with mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene being the most frequently identified cause of ALS. Interfamily and intrafamily phenotypic variability have been associated with some SOD1 mutations but not with other mutations.1 2 We prospectively screened sporadic ALS and FALS patients from Switzerland for SOD1 mutations and followed their clinical course.

Methods: With written informed consent and approval by the local ethical review boards, blood was drawn from 257 patients and from 245 Swiss blood donors matched for ethnicity, age and gender. Forty-seven of the patients had one or more affected blood relatives within three generations and were classified as FALS. SOD1 analysis was performed in Sweden as described.1

Results: Nine patients from seven unrelated families carried a SOD1 mutation (table 1), including three novel mutations (V5L, L144F (TTG→TTT) and E78insSI (c.240-7T→G)). Among the controls, a single individual was found to be heterozygous for a silent mutation A140A.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:10 Nov 2011 13:47
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 09:32
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0022-3050
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.2011.241349
PubMed ID:21700728

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