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Dopaminergic modulation of receptive fields in rat sensorimotor cortex


Hosp, J A; Hertler, B; Atiemo, C O; Luft, A R (2011). Dopaminergic modulation of receptive fields in rat sensorimotor cortex. NeuroImage, 54(1):154-160.

Abstract

Dopaminergic projections to primary sensorimotor cortex (SMC) have been described anatomically, but their functional role is unknown. The objective here was to characterize how dopamine modulates the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and its receptive field in SMC. SEPs were evoked by median and tibial nerve stimulation and recorded using thin-film multielectrode arrays implanted epidurally over the caudal sensorimotor cortex of rats. SEP amplitudes and receptive fields were measured before and after intracortical injection of a D1- (SCH 23390) or a D2-receptor antagonist (raclopride). Both increased maximum SEP amplitudes by 107.5% and 82.1%, respectively (p<0.01), while vehicle application had no effect (5.9% change). SEP latencies and receptive fields remained unchanged. Dopamine antagonists increase the excitability of sensorimotor cortex to afferent signals. Dopamine, therefore, expectedly reduces SMC excitability thereby improving sensory signal-to-noise ratio. Dopaminergic modulation may render SMC circuitry more effective in processing sensory information from different sources.

Abstract

Dopaminergic projections to primary sensorimotor cortex (SMC) have been described anatomically, but their functional role is unknown. The objective here was to characterize how dopamine modulates the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and its receptive field in SMC. SEPs were evoked by median and tibial nerve stimulation and recorded using thin-film multielectrode arrays implanted epidurally over the caudal sensorimotor cortex of rats. SEP amplitudes and receptive fields were measured before and after intracortical injection of a D1- (SCH 23390) or a D2-receptor antagonist (raclopride). Both increased maximum SEP amplitudes by 107.5% and 82.1%, respectively (p<0.01), while vehicle application had no effect (5.9% change). SEP latencies and receptive fields remained unchanged. Dopamine antagonists increase the excitability of sensorimotor cortex to afferent signals. Dopamine, therefore, expectedly reduces SMC excitability thereby improving sensory signal-to-noise ratio. Dopaminergic modulation may render SMC circuitry more effective in processing sensory information from different sources.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:15 Nov 2011 11:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:06
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.07.029
PubMed ID:20643216

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