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How early triadic family processes predict children’s strengths and difficulties at age three


von Wyl, A; Perren, S; Braune-Krickau, K; Simoni, H; Stadlmayr, W; Bürgin, D; von Klitzing, K (2008). How early triadic family processes predict children’s strengths and difficulties at age three. European Journal Of Developmental Psychology, 5(4):466-491.

Abstract

This study aimed to determine longitudinal associations of early triadic family processes and 3-year-old children’s strengths and difficulties and to control those associations for family risk factors. In 80 families expecting their first child, we assessed parents’ anticipations of future family relationships (Triadic Capacity) and parents’ psychological distress, marital quality, and education level. When the children were 4 months of age, we observed triadic family interaction in a standardized laboratory play scenario. The children’s strengths and difficulties at age three were assessed using multiple methods. As expected,
parents’ Triadic Capacity assessed before the child was born predicted triadic family interaction 4 months after birth. Early triadic family processes explained variance in children’s emotional functioning at age three over and
above the effects of family stress factors assessed before the child was born. However, early triadic family processes did not explain children’s co-operative behaviour or children’s symptoms at age three. Results also highlighted the roles of fathers’ education level in children’s externalizing behaviour, mothers’ psychological distress at children’s low co-operative behaviour, and low marital quality in children’s internalizing behaviour.

Abstract

This study aimed to determine longitudinal associations of early triadic family processes and 3-year-old children’s strengths and difficulties and to control those associations for family risk factors. In 80 families expecting their first child, we assessed parents’ anticipations of future family relationships (Triadic Capacity) and parents’ psychological distress, marital quality, and education level. When the children were 4 months of age, we observed triadic family interaction in a standardized laboratory play scenario. The children’s strengths and difficulties at age three were assessed using multiple methods. As expected,
parents’ Triadic Capacity assessed before the child was born predicted triadic family interaction 4 months after birth. Early triadic family processes explained variance in children’s emotional functioning at age three over and
above the effects of family stress factors assessed before the child was born. However, early triadic family processes did not explain children’s co-operative behaviour or children’s symptoms at age three. Results also highlighted the roles of fathers’ education level in children’s externalizing behaviour, mothers’ psychological distress at children’s low co-operative behaviour, and low marital quality in children’s internalizing behaviour.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Date:2008
Deposited On:12 Jan 2009 11:40
Last Modified:26 Jan 2017 08:41
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1740-5610
Additional Information:This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the European Journal Of Developmental Psychology © 2008 [copyright Taylor & Francis]; European Journal Of Developmental Psychology is available online at informaworldTM with the open URL of your article
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17405620600989701
Official URL:http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a778057534~db=all~order=page

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