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Impact of obesity on stroke outcome after intravenous thrombolysis


Sarikaya, H; Elmas, F; Arnold, M; Georgiadis, D; Baumgartner, R W (2011). Impact of obesity on stroke outcome after intravenous thrombolysis. Stroke, 42(8):2330-2332.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Obesity is an established risk factor for stroke and has reached epidemic proportions. However, its impact on intravenous thrombolysis applied for acute ischemic stroke is not well known. We aimed to compare the clinical outcome and safety after intravenous thrombolysis in obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m²) and nonobese (body mass index <30 kg/m²) patients with ischemic stroke.
METHODS:

Data of 304 consecutive patients with stroke (251 nonobese and 53 obese) treated with intravenous thrombolysis were studied. We assessed the rate of favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0 or 1), mortality, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the 2 groups.
RESULTS:

Obese patients presented more often with diabetes mellitus (30.2% versus 12.4%, P<0.01) and arterial hypertension (77.4% versus 61.4%, P=0.03) as compared with their nonobese counterparts. At 3 months, the rate of favorable outcome was lower in obese compared with nonobese patients (50.9% versus 68.1%, P=0.02). More obese than nonobese patients died (13.2% versus 4.0%, P=0.01), whereas the rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was similar in the 2 groups (1.9% versus 1.6%, P=1.0). After multivariable adjustment, obesity still remained an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome (P=0.04) and mortality (P=0.04).
CONCLUSIONS:

Our data indicate that obesity is an independent predictor of unfavorable clinical outcome and mortality in acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Obesity is an established risk factor for stroke and has reached epidemic proportions. However, its impact on intravenous thrombolysis applied for acute ischemic stroke is not well known. We aimed to compare the clinical outcome and safety after intravenous thrombolysis in obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m²) and nonobese (body mass index <30 kg/m²) patients with ischemic stroke.
METHODS:

Data of 304 consecutive patients with stroke (251 nonobese and 53 obese) treated with intravenous thrombolysis were studied. We assessed the rate of favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0 or 1), mortality, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the 2 groups.
RESULTS:

Obese patients presented more often with diabetes mellitus (30.2% versus 12.4%, P<0.01) and arterial hypertension (77.4% versus 61.4%, P=0.03) as compared with their nonobese counterparts. At 3 months, the rate of favorable outcome was lower in obese compared with nonobese patients (50.9% versus 68.1%, P=0.02). More obese than nonobese patients died (13.2% versus 4.0%, P=0.01), whereas the rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was similar in the 2 groups (1.9% versus 1.6%, P=1.0). After multivariable adjustment, obesity still remained an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome (P=0.04) and mortality (P=0.04).
CONCLUSIONS:

Our data indicate that obesity is an independent predictor of unfavorable clinical outcome and mortality in acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

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16 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:07 Jan 2012 22:02
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 09:39
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0039-2499
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.599613
PubMed ID:21757671

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