Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Vitreoretinal surgery


Gelatt, K N; Spiess, B M; Gilger, B C (2011). Vitreoretinal surgery. In: Gelatt, K N; Gelatt, J P. Veterinary Ophthalmic Surgery. USA: Elsevier Saunders, 357-387.

Abstract

Diseases of the posterior segment, including those affecting the vitreous, retina, choroid, and optic disc, are common in small animals. These diseases may be of congenital, traumatic, inflammatory, degenerative, and neoplastic origin. Diseases of the vitreous affect both cats and dogs, but are more frequent in dogs. Vitreal conditions include persistence of the primary hyaloid vasculature (persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous [PHPV]), vitreal syneresis (liquefaction of the vitreous), asteroid hyalosis (presence of numerous white spherical opacities suspended in the vitreous), vitreal hemorrhage, and vitreal herniation through the pupil. Presentation of vitreous in the pupil and anterior chamber is usually associated with lens displacement and lensectomy, and cataract removal with rupture of the posterior lens capsule and anterior vitreous membrane. Neoplasms, pigment, parasites, foreign bodies, and cysts also affect the vitreous. For these vitreal diseases, surgery may be indicated for diagnosis, or treatment of the vitreal pupillary herniation into the anterior chamber. The removal of diseased vitreous and traction bands in the repair of retinal detachments will be presented in the section on retinal surgeries.
Congenital and degenerative retinopathies are among the more frequently diagnosed clinical disorders in dogs, and the majority of these retinopathies appear inherited. Inflammations of the retina and choroid in dogs are frequent, and often associated with systemic infections. In cats, congenital and degenerative retinopathies are less frequent, but inflammations of the ocular fundus and hypertensive retinopathies are common. Surgeries of the retina and choroid in small animals include retinal or chorioretinal biopsies, and the correction of retinal detachments.

The development of the different types of vitreoretinal surgeries in small animals is still early, but these surgeries have been reported since the 1970s. The expensive instrumentation and time-consuming training have delayed application of vitreoretinal surgical procedures in veterinary ophthalmology. Nevertheless, several institutional veterinary ophthalmology centers offer this highly specialized service. The inclusion of vitreoretinal surgery in this text will hopefully stimulate its continued development in small animals. In horses anterior vitrectomy has been recommended in the treatment of recurrent uveitis, and is used widely in Europe.

Abstract

Diseases of the posterior segment, including those affecting the vitreous, retina, choroid, and optic disc, are common in small animals. These diseases may be of congenital, traumatic, inflammatory, degenerative, and neoplastic origin. Diseases of the vitreous affect both cats and dogs, but are more frequent in dogs. Vitreal conditions include persistence of the primary hyaloid vasculature (persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous [PHPV]), vitreal syneresis (liquefaction of the vitreous), asteroid hyalosis (presence of numerous white spherical opacities suspended in the vitreous), vitreal hemorrhage, and vitreal herniation through the pupil. Presentation of vitreous in the pupil and anterior chamber is usually associated with lens displacement and lensectomy, and cataract removal with rupture of the posterior lens capsule and anterior vitreous membrane. Neoplasms, pigment, parasites, foreign bodies, and cysts also affect the vitreous. For these vitreal diseases, surgery may be indicated for diagnosis, or treatment of the vitreal pupillary herniation into the anterior chamber. The removal of diseased vitreous and traction bands in the repair of retinal detachments will be presented in the section on retinal surgeries.
Congenital and degenerative retinopathies are among the more frequently diagnosed clinical disorders in dogs, and the majority of these retinopathies appear inherited. Inflammations of the retina and choroid in dogs are frequent, and often associated with systemic infections. In cats, congenital and degenerative retinopathies are less frequent, but inflammations of the ocular fundus and hypertensive retinopathies are common. Surgeries of the retina and choroid in small animals include retinal or chorioretinal biopsies, and the correction of retinal detachments.

The development of the different types of vitreoretinal surgeries in small animals is still early, but these surgeries have been reported since the 1970s. The expensive instrumentation and time-consuming training have delayed application of vitreoretinal surgical procedures in veterinary ophthalmology. Nevertheless, several institutional veterinary ophthalmology centers offer this highly specialized service. The inclusion of vitreoretinal surgery in this text will hopefully stimulate its continued development in small animals. In horses anterior vitrectomy has been recommended in the treatment of recurrent uveitis, and is used widely in Europe.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 21 Nov 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:October 2011
Deposited On:21 Nov 2011 09:45
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 09:41
Publisher:Elsevier Saunders
ISBN:978-0-7020-3429-9
Related URLs:http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookdescription.cws_home/724562/description

Download

Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 471kB