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Additive genetic variance, heritability, and inbreeding depression in male extra-pair reproductive success


Reid, J M; Arcese, P; Sardell, R J; Keller, L F (2011). Additive genetic variance, heritability, and inbreeding depression in male extra-pair reproductive success. American Naturalist, 177(2):177-187.

Abstract

The hypothesis that female extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous animals reflects indirect genetic benefits requires that there be additive and/or nonadditive genetic variance in fitness. However, the specific hypotheses that male extra-pair reproductive success (EPRS) shows additive genetic variance (VA), heritability (h(2)), or inbreeding depression, and hence that females could acquire indirect genetic benefits through increased EPRS of sons, have not been explicitly tested. We used comprehensive genetic pedigree data from song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to estimate V(A), h(2), and inbreeding depression in the number of extra-pair offspring a male sired per year and the probability that a male would sire any extra-pair offspring per year. Inbreeding depression was substantial: more inbred males sired fewer extra-pair offspring and were less likely to sire any extra-pair offspring. In contrast, estimates of V(A) and h(2) were close to 0, although 95% credible intervals were relatively wide. These data suggest that females could accrue indirect genetic benefits, in terms of increased EPRS of outbred sons, by mating with unrelated social or extra-pair mates. In contrast, any indirect benefit of extra-pair reproduction in terms of producing sons with high additive genetic value for EPRS is most likely to be small.

Abstract

The hypothesis that female extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous animals reflects indirect genetic benefits requires that there be additive and/or nonadditive genetic variance in fitness. However, the specific hypotheses that male extra-pair reproductive success (EPRS) shows additive genetic variance (VA), heritability (h(2)), or inbreeding depression, and hence that females could acquire indirect genetic benefits through increased EPRS of sons, have not been explicitly tested. We used comprehensive genetic pedigree data from song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to estimate V(A), h(2), and inbreeding depression in the number of extra-pair offspring a male sired per year and the probability that a male would sire any extra-pair offspring per year. Inbreeding depression was substantial: more inbred males sired fewer extra-pair offspring and were less likely to sire any extra-pair offspring. In contrast, estimates of V(A) and h(2) were close to 0, although 95% credible intervals were relatively wide. These data suggest that females could accrue indirect genetic benefits, in terms of increased EPRS of outbred sons, by mating with unrelated social or extra-pair mates. In contrast, any indirect benefit of extra-pair reproduction in terms of producing sons with high additive genetic value for EPRS is most likely to be small.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:18 Nov 2011 09:55
Last Modified:21 Nov 2017 15:32
Publisher:University of Chicago Press
ISSN:0003-0147
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1086/657977
Other Identification Number:ISI:000286789700003

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