Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Non-invasive pulmonary perfusion assessment in young patients with cystic fibrosis using an arterial spin labeling MR technique at 1.5 T


Schraml, C; Schwenzer, N F; Martirosian, P; Boss, A; Schick, F; Schäfer, S; Stern, M; Claussen, C D; Schäfer, J F (2012). Non-invasive pulmonary perfusion assessment in young patients with cystic fibrosis using an arterial spin labeling MR technique at 1.5 T. Magma, 25(2):155-162.

Abstract

OBJECT: To assess lung perfusion in young patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) using an arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Perfusion imaging was performed in 5 healthy volunteers and 33 pediatric patients (13 ± 5 years) with CF using an ASL technique. Image quality was evaluated on a five-point scale (1 = excellent). Quantitative perfusion maps were calculated based on the modified Bloch equations. Perfusion differences between volunteers and CF patients and regional differences between lobes were analyzed using Student's t test. The association of perfusion values and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was analyzed using univariate regression analysis. RESULTS: Mean lung perfusion was 698 ± 67 ml/100g/min (range: 593-777 ml/100g/min) in volunteers and 526 ± 113 ml/100g/min (range: 346-724 ml/100g/min) in CF patients. Median image quality was 2 in volunteers and 3 in CF patients. In CF patients, significantly lower perfusion was observed in the upper lobes compared to healthy volunteers. Mean perfusion values significantly correlated with FEV1 (r = 0.84, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: ASL perfusion imaging provides lung perfusion assessment in young CF patients. This non-invasive functional imaging technique is worth being evaluated in the clinical monitoring of CF patients.

Abstract

OBJECT: To assess lung perfusion in young patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) using an arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Perfusion imaging was performed in 5 healthy volunteers and 33 pediatric patients (13 ± 5 years) with CF using an ASL technique. Image quality was evaluated on a five-point scale (1 = excellent). Quantitative perfusion maps were calculated based on the modified Bloch equations. Perfusion differences between volunteers and CF patients and regional differences between lobes were analyzed using Student's t test. The association of perfusion values and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was analyzed using univariate regression analysis. RESULTS: Mean lung perfusion was 698 ± 67 ml/100g/min (range: 593-777 ml/100g/min) in volunteers and 526 ± 113 ml/100g/min (range: 346-724 ml/100g/min) in CF patients. Median image quality was 2 in volunteers and 3 in CF patients. In CF patients, significantly lower perfusion was observed in the upper lobes compared to healthy volunteers. Mean perfusion values significantly correlated with FEV1 (r = 0.84, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: ASL perfusion imaging provides lung perfusion assessment in young CF patients. This non-invasive functional imaging technique is worth being evaluated in the clinical monitoring of CF patients.

Statistics

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:21 Nov 2011 13:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:07
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0968-5243
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10334-011-0271-x
PubMed ID:21786163

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations