Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Operational atmospheric correction for imaging spectrometers accounting for the smile effect


Richter, R; Schläpfer, D; Müller, A (2011). Operational atmospheric correction for imaging spectrometers accounting for the smile effect. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 49(5):1772-1780.

Abstract

Hyperspectral pushbroom imagers are affected by a number of artifacts, such as pixel nonuniformity, spectral smile, and keystone. These have to be taken into account during sys- tem correction, orthorectification, or atmospheric correction, as performed in processing and archiving facilities (PAFs). This con- tribution is presenting an efficient and accurate smile correction method integrated in the atmospheric correction. The proposed technique will be used in the PAF of the German hyperspectral Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program mission. The spec- tral smile shift across the detector array is parametrized with a fourth-order polynomial function for each channel based on the instrument optical design model or measured laboratory data. Alternatively, spectral smile shifts can be calculated from image data using channels in atmospheric absorption regions. The con- cept for the time-optimized processor is outlined, and the results are presented for simulated EnMAP data and existing pushbroom imagery [HYPERION, AISA (Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications), and HYSPEX (Hyperspectral Camera)].

Abstract

Hyperspectral pushbroom imagers are affected by a number of artifacts, such as pixel nonuniformity, spectral smile, and keystone. These have to be taken into account during sys- tem correction, orthorectification, or atmospheric correction, as performed in processing and archiving facilities (PAFs). This con- tribution is presenting an efficient and accurate smile correction method integrated in the atmospheric correction. The proposed technique will be used in the PAF of the German hyperspectral Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program mission. The spec- tral smile shift across the detector array is parametrized with a fourth-order polynomial function for each channel based on the instrument optical design model or measured laboratory data. Alternatively, spectral smile shifts can be calculated from image data using channels in atmospheric absorption regions. The con- cept for the time-optimized processor is outlined, and the results are presented for simulated EnMAP data and existing pushbroom imagery [HYPERION, AISA (Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications), and HYSPEX (Hyperspectral Camera)].

Statistics

Citations

14 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 25 Nov 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:25 Nov 2011 12:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:07
Publisher:IEEE
ISSN:0196-2892
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/TGRS.2010.2089799

Download