Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Gender-specific differences and the impact of family integration on time trends in age-stratified Swiss suicide rates


Riebler, A; Held, L; Rue, H; Bopp, M (2012). Gender-specific differences and the impact of family integration on time trends in age-stratified Swiss suicide rates. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series A, 175(2):473-490.

Abstract

Suicide has become one of the leading causes of death of Swiss males aged between 15 and 44 years, whose age-standardized rates are about three times higher than those for females. We compared age-stratified suicide rates of Swiss men and women aged 15–79 years and analysed gender-specific differences from 1950 to 2007. Furthermore, we explored whether changes in measures of family integration can explain changes in suicide trends. The use of multivariate age–period–cohort models avoids age aggregation and allows the exploration of heterogeneous time trends across age, period and birth cohort. In addition, explanatory variables can be included. We found strong gender-specific differences in suicide mortality.
Although the same risk factors may act on age and overdispersion, there was no significant correlation between gender-specific cohort effects. Family integration had an effect on Swiss suicide risk but only partially explained the underlying trends over time.

Abstract

Suicide has become one of the leading causes of death of Swiss males aged between 15 and 44 years, whose age-standardized rates are about three times higher than those for females. We compared age-stratified suicide rates of Swiss men and women aged 15–79 years and analysed gender-specific differences from 1950 to 2007. Furthermore, we explored whether changes in measures of family integration can explain changes in suicide trends. The use of multivariate age–period–cohort models avoids age aggregation and allows the exploration of heterogeneous time trends across age, period and birth cohort. In addition, explanatory variables can be included. We found strong gender-specific differences in suicide mortality.
Although the same risk factors may act on age and overdispersion, there was no significant correlation between gender-specific cohort effects. Family integration had an effect on Swiss suicide risk but only partially explained the underlying trends over time.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
4 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
4 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

40 downloads since deposited on 01 Dec 2011
14 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:01 Dec 2011 09:39
Last Modified:16 Feb 2018 23:08
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0964-1998
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-985X.2011.01013.x

Download