Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Ulceroglandular tularemia


Potz-Biedermann, C; Schwendemann, L; Schröppel, K; Sönnichsen, K; Schmidt, D; Schaller, M (2011). Ulceroglandular tularemia. Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft, 9(10):806-808.

Abstract

An increasing number of patients with the zoonosis tularemia have been reported in the last few years in Europe. Tularemia can be divided into different forms depending on its appearance. Tularemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of diseases that present with an ulcer and regional lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis can be confirmed by culturing Francisella tularensis. With effective antibiotic intervention, the prognosis is favorable. Typically tularemia develops after outdoor activities; it is generally transferred by blood-sucking arthropods from infected wild animals to humans.

Abstract

An increasing number of patients with the zoonosis tularemia have been reported in the last few years in Europe. Tularemia can be divided into different forms depending on its appearance. Tularemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of diseases that present with an ulcer and regional lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis can be confirmed by culturing Francisella tularensis. With effective antibiotic intervention, the prognosis is favorable. Typically tularemia develops after outdoor activities; it is generally transferred by blood-sucking arthropods from infected wild animals to humans.

Statistics

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:02 Dec 2011 14:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:08
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1610-0379
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1610-0387.2011.07670.x
PubMed ID:21501382

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher