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Prospective morphologic and dynamic assessment of deep flexor tendon healing in zone II by high-frequency ultrasound: Preliminary experience


Puippe, G D; Lindenblatt, N; Gnannt, R; Giovanoli, P; Andreisek, G; Calcagni, M (2011). Prospective morphologic and dynamic assessment of deep flexor tendon healing in zone II by high-frequency ultrasound: Preliminary experience. American Journal of Roentgenology, 197(6):W1110-W1117.

Abstract

Preliminary data of this study indicate a better clinical outcome if a sutured tendon maintains a spindlelike shape and increased power Doppler signal. This might indicate a predominantly intrinsic healing pattern with reduced adhesion formation. Ultrasound morphology, power Doppler signal, and tendon excursion may be helpful tools to rate tendon healing and to establish individually modified rehabilitation protocols.

Abstract

Preliminary data of this study indicate a better clinical outcome if a sutured tendon maintains a spindlelike shape and increased power Doppler signal. This might indicate a predominantly intrinsic healing pattern with reduced adhesion formation. Ultrasound morphology, power Doppler signal, and tendon excursion may be helpful tools to rate tendon healing and to establish individually modified rehabilitation protocols.

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7 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:20 Dec 2011 12:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:14
Publisher:American Roentgen Ray Society
ISSN:0361-803X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2214/AJR.11.6891
PubMed ID:22109327

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