Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

No effect of Implanon® on inflammatory cardiovascular parameters


Merki-Feld, G S; Rosselli, M; Imthurn, B; Spanaus, K (2011). No effect of Implanon® on inflammatory cardiovascular parameters. Gynecological Endocrinology, 27(11):951-955.

Abstract

Objective. Recently, we found decreased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) during use of the low-dosed contraceptive implant Implanon1. To further elucidate, whether this finding might be a sign for a lower inflammatory reaction and is associated with changes in levels of other cytokines, we investigated the effect of this implant on interleukin-6 (IL-6) and adiponectin. Plasma lipids and sex hormone levels have been shown to interact with the investigated parameters in vivo and in vitro. Therefore these parameters were measured as well.
Design. Prospective case–control study. Setting. Family-planning centre, University hospital. Subjects. Thirty-six non-smoking women with regular cycles. Interventions. Blood samples for the measurements were taken in the early follicular phase of the cycle in both groups. A second sample was taken 12 weeks after Implanon insertion or in the controls during the early follicular phase of cycle 4.
Results. Implanon did not cause significant changes in IL-6, adiponectin or lipoprotein (Lp)(a). At baseline, there was a significant positive correlation between IL-6 and CRP and a negative correlation between adiponectin and CRP. Conclusion. We did not observe a negative impact of Implanon on risk markers for atherosclerotic disease such as IL-6, adiponectin, and Lp(a). These data are reassuring for clinicians who prescribe progestagen-only preparations as first choice contraceptives in females with cardiovascular risk factors. Keywords: Contraception, cardiovascular risk, inflammatory markers, Implanon1, hormonal contraception, progestagens

Abstract

Objective. Recently, we found decreased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) during use of the low-dosed contraceptive implant Implanon1. To further elucidate, whether this finding might be a sign for a lower inflammatory reaction and is associated with changes in levels of other cytokines, we investigated the effect of this implant on interleukin-6 (IL-6) and adiponectin. Plasma lipids and sex hormone levels have been shown to interact with the investigated parameters in vivo and in vitro. Therefore these parameters were measured as well.
Design. Prospective case–control study. Setting. Family-planning centre, University hospital. Subjects. Thirty-six non-smoking women with regular cycles. Interventions. Blood samples for the measurements were taken in the early follicular phase of the cycle in both groups. A second sample was taken 12 weeks after Implanon insertion or in the controls during the early follicular phase of cycle 4.
Results. Implanon did not cause significant changes in IL-6, adiponectin or lipoprotein (Lp)(a). At baseline, there was a significant positive correlation between IL-6 and CRP and a negative correlation between adiponectin and CRP. Conclusion. We did not observe a negative impact of Implanon on risk markers for atherosclerotic disease such as IL-6, adiponectin, and Lp(a). These data are reassuring for clinicians who prescribe progestagen-only preparations as first choice contraceptives in females with cardiovascular risk factors. Keywords: Contraception, cardiovascular risk, inflammatory markers, Implanon1, hormonal contraception, progestagens

Statistics

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reproductive Endocrinology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:13 Jan 2012 08:11
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 10:41
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:0951-3590
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3109/09513590.2011.564684
PubMed ID:21438668

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher