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Aging and circadian disruption: causes and effects


Brown, S A; Schmitt, K; Eckert, A (2011). Aging and circadian disruption: causes and effects. Aging, 3(8):813-817.

Abstract

The relationship between aging and daily "circadian" behavior in humans is bidirectional: on the one hand, dysfunction of circadian clocks promotes age-related maladies; on the other, aging per se leads to changes and disruption in circadian behavior and physiology. For the latter case, recent research suggests that changes to both homeostatic and circadian sleep regulatory mechanisms may play a role. Could hormonal changes be in part responsible?

Abstract

The relationship between aging and daily "circadian" behavior in humans is bidirectional: on the one hand, dysfunction of circadian clocks promotes age-related maladies; on the other, aging per se leads to changes and disruption in circadian behavior and physiology. For the latter case, recent research suggests that changes to both homeostatic and circadian sleep regulatory mechanisms may play a role. Could hormonal changes be in part responsible?

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16 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
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30 downloads since deposited on 13 Jan 2012
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:13 Jan 2012 10:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:16
Publisher:Impact Journals LLC
ISSN:1945-4589
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.impactaging.com/papers/v3/n8/full/100366.html
PubMed ID:21869460

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