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Relationship of hyperactivity/inattention with adiposity and lifestyle characteristics in preschool children


Ebenegger, V; Marques-Vidal, P M; Munsch, S; Quartier, V; Nydegger, A; Barral, J; Hartmann, T; Dubnov-Raz, G; Kriemler, S; Puder, J J (2012). Relationship of hyperactivity/inattention with adiposity and lifestyle characteristics in preschool children. Journal of Child Neurology, 27(7):852-858.

Abstract

We performed a cross-sectional study in 450 nonreferred preschool children aged 4 to 6 years to assess the association between hyperactivity/inattention with adiposity and lifestyle characteristics. Measurements included scores of hyperactivity/inattention, adiposity, objectively measured physical activity, television viewing, and eating habits. Higher scores of hyperactivity/inattention were associated with lower percentage body fat, higher levels of physical activity, and less time spent in sedentary activity (all P ≤ .01). However, higher scores of hyperactivity/inattention were also associated with more television viewing and less healthy eating habits (all P ≤ .04). Except for some selected eating habits (P ≥ .07), those relationships remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, and sociodemographic confounders. To conclude, higher scores of hyperactivity/inattention are linked to different lifestyle characteristics that may in part contribute to a future development of overweight/obesity. Precise mechanisms explaining these associations and possible preventive approaches should be further investigated.

Abstract

We performed a cross-sectional study in 450 nonreferred preschool children aged 4 to 6 years to assess the association between hyperactivity/inattention with adiposity and lifestyle characteristics. Measurements included scores of hyperactivity/inattention, adiposity, objectively measured physical activity, television viewing, and eating habits. Higher scores of hyperactivity/inattention were associated with lower percentage body fat, higher levels of physical activity, and less time spent in sedentary activity (all P ≤ .01). However, higher scores of hyperactivity/inattention were also associated with more television viewing and less healthy eating habits (all P ≤ .04). Except for some selected eating habits (P ≥ .07), those relationships remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, and sociodemographic confounders. To conclude, higher scores of hyperactivity/inattention are linked to different lifestyle characteristics that may in part contribute to a future development of overweight/obesity. Precise mechanisms explaining these associations and possible preventive approaches should be further investigated.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:24 Jan 2012 15:23
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 11:12
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0883-0738
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0883073811428009
PubMed ID:22209757

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