Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Locomotion in stroke subjects: interactions between unaffected and affected sides


Kloter, E; Wirz, M; Dietz, V (2011). Locomotion in stroke subjects: interactions between unaffected and affected sides. Brain: A Journal of Neurology, 134(Pt 3):721-731.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensorimotor interactions between unaffected and affected sides of post-stroke subjects during locomotion. In healthy subjects, stimulation of the tibial nerve during the mid-stance phase is followed by electromyography responses not only in the ipsilateral tibialis anterior, but also in the proximal arm muscles of both sides, with larger amplitudes prior to swing over an obstacle compared with normal swing. In post-stroke subjects, the electromyography responses were stronger on both sides when the tibial nerve of the unaffected leg was stimulated compared with stimulation of the affected leg. This difference was more pronounced when stimuli were applied prior to swing over an obstacle than prior to normal swing. This indicates an impaired processing of afferent input from the affected leg resulting in attenuated and little task-modulated reflex responses in the arm muscles on both sides. In contrast, an afferent volley from the unaffected leg resulted in larger electromyography responses, even in the muscles of the affected arm. Arm muscle activations were stronger during swing over an obstacle than during normal swing, with no difference in electromyography amplitudes between the unaffected and affected sides. It is concluded that the deficits of the affected arm are compensated for by influences from the unaffected side. These observations indicate strong mutual influences between unaffected and affected sides during locomotion of post-stroke subjects, which might be used to optimize rehabilitation approaches.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensorimotor interactions between unaffected and affected sides of post-stroke subjects during locomotion. In healthy subjects, stimulation of the tibial nerve during the mid-stance phase is followed by electromyography responses not only in the ipsilateral tibialis anterior, but also in the proximal arm muscles of both sides, with larger amplitudes prior to swing over an obstacle compared with normal swing. In post-stroke subjects, the electromyography responses were stronger on both sides when the tibial nerve of the unaffected leg was stimulated compared with stimulation of the affected leg. This difference was more pronounced when stimuli were applied prior to swing over an obstacle than prior to normal swing. This indicates an impaired processing of afferent input from the affected leg resulting in attenuated and little task-modulated reflex responses in the arm muscles on both sides. In contrast, an afferent volley from the unaffected leg resulted in larger electromyography responses, even in the muscles of the affected arm. Arm muscle activations were stronger during swing over an obstacle than during normal swing, with no difference in electromyography amplitudes between the unaffected and affected sides. It is concluded that the deficits of the affected arm are compensated for by influences from the unaffected side. These observations indicate strong mutual influences between unaffected and affected sides during locomotion of post-stroke subjects, which might be used to optimize rehabilitation approaches.

Statistics

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
20 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2011
Deposited On:16 Jan 2012 10:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:21
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0006-8950
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awq370
PubMed ID:21303854

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations