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Anti-Nogo-A and training: Can one plus one equal three?


Starkey, M; Schwab, M E (2012). Anti-Nogo-A and training: Can one plus one equal three? Experimental Neurology, 235(1):53-61.

Abstract

Following spinal cord injury (SCI) the adult central nervous system (CNS) has a limited but substantial capacity for repair and plastic reorganisation. The degree of reorganisation is determined by a number of factors such as the extent and location of the lesion, the remaining circuit activity within the CNS and the age at injury. However, even in the best cases this spontaneous reorganisation does not lead to full recovery of the affected behaviour but instead often results in a functionally successful but compensatory strategy. Current SCI research focuses on enhancing fibre tract (re-)growth and recovery processes. Two currently promising approaches are the neutralisation of CNS growth inhibitory factors, and rehabilitative training of remaining networks. Independently, both approaches can lead to substantial functional recovery and anatomical reorganisation. In this review we focus on Nogo-A, a neurite growth inhibitory protein present in the adult CNS, and its role in regenerative and plastic growth following SCI. We then discuss the efforts of rehabilitative training and the potential combination of the two therapies.

Abstract

Following spinal cord injury (SCI) the adult central nervous system (CNS) has a limited but substantial capacity for repair and plastic reorganisation. The degree of reorganisation is determined by a number of factors such as the extent and location of the lesion, the remaining circuit activity within the CNS and the age at injury. However, even in the best cases this spontaneous reorganisation does not lead to full recovery of the affected behaviour but instead often results in a functionally successful but compensatory strategy. Current SCI research focuses on enhancing fibre tract (re-)growth and recovery processes. Two currently promising approaches are the neutralisation of CNS growth inhibitory factors, and rehabilitative training of remaining networks. Independently, both approaches can lead to substantial functional recovery and anatomical reorganisation. In this review we focus on Nogo-A, a neurite growth inhibitory protein present in the adult CNS, and its role in regenerative and plastic growth following SCI. We then discuss the efforts of rehabilitative training and the potential combination of the two therapies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Brain Research Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:11 Jan 2012 17:11
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 11:14
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0014-4886
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2011.04.008
PubMed ID:21530508

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