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Influence of antiretroviral therapy on liver disease


Kovari, H; Weber, R (2011). Influence of antiretroviral therapy on liver disease. Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS, 6(4):272-277.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Liver disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected persons. The long-term beneficial versus potentially harmful influence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the liver is debated. We review current data on factors contributing to liver disease in HIV-monoinfected as well as in HIV/viral hepatitis-coinfected patients, highlighting the role of ART, HIV itself, immunodeficiency, patient characteristics, and lifestyle risk factors.
RECENT FINDINGS:

New ART-related clinical syndromes, including noncirrhotic portal hypertension and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, have emerged, and observational data suggest long-term ART-associated liver injury. Recently, there is increasing evidence that HIV itself and immunosuppression are contributing to liver injury in both HIV-coinfected and HIV-monoinfected patients. In HIV-positive persons, ART attenuates progression of chronic viral hepatitis.
SUMMARY:

Current expert guidelines recommend earlier treatment of HIV infection in persons coinfected with hepatitis B virus and possibly hepatitis C virus. It is unknown whether an earlier start of ART is beneficial for the liver in HIV-monoinfected patients. Future research should focus on long-term ART-related hepatotoxicity.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Liver disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected persons. The long-term beneficial versus potentially harmful influence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the liver is debated. We review current data on factors contributing to liver disease in HIV-monoinfected as well as in HIV/viral hepatitis-coinfected patients, highlighting the role of ART, HIV itself, immunodeficiency, patient characteristics, and lifestyle risk factors.
RECENT FINDINGS:

New ART-related clinical syndromes, including noncirrhotic portal hypertension and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, have emerged, and observational data suggest long-term ART-associated liver injury. Recently, there is increasing evidence that HIV itself and immunosuppression are contributing to liver injury in both HIV-coinfected and HIV-monoinfected patients. In HIV-positive persons, ART attenuates progression of chronic viral hepatitis.
SUMMARY:

Current expert guidelines recommend earlier treatment of HIV infection in persons coinfected with hepatitis B virus and possibly hepatitis C virus. It is unknown whether an earlier start of ART is beneficial for the liver in HIV-monoinfected patients. Future research should focus on long-term ART-related hepatotoxicity.

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16 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:15 Jan 2012 16:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:22
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:1746-630X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/COH.0b013e3283473405
PubMed ID:21508839

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