Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Unmet needs in patients with first-episode schizophrenia: a longitudinal perspective


Landolt, K; Rössler, W; Burns, T; Ajdacic-Gross, V; Galderisi, S; Libiger, J; Naber, D; Derks, E M; Kahn, R S; Fleischhacker, W W (2012). Unmet needs in patients with first-episode schizophrenia: a longitudinal perspective. Psychological Medicine, 42(07):1461-1473.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study aimed to identify the course of unmet needs by patients with a first episode of schizophrenia and to determine associated variables.MethodWe investigated baseline assessments in the European First Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST) and also follow-up interviews at 6 and 12 months. Latent class growth analysis was used to identify patient groups based on individual differences in the development of unmet needs. Multinomial logistic regression determined the predictors of group membership.
RESULTS:

Four classes were identified. Three differed in their baseline levels of unmet needs whereas the fourth had a marked decrease in such needs. Main predictors of class membership were prognosis and depression at baseline, and the quality of life and psychosocial intervention at follow-up. Depression at follow-up did not vary among classes.
CONCLUSIONS:

We identified subtypes of patients with different courses of unmet needs. Prognosis of clinical improvement was a better predictor for the decline in unmet needs than was psychopathology. Needs concerning social relationships were particularly persistent in patients who remained high in their unmet needs and who lacked additional psychosocial treatment.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study aimed to identify the course of unmet needs by patients with a first episode of schizophrenia and to determine associated variables.MethodWe investigated baseline assessments in the European First Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST) and also follow-up interviews at 6 and 12 months. Latent class growth analysis was used to identify patient groups based on individual differences in the development of unmet needs. Multinomial logistic regression determined the predictors of group membership.
RESULTS:

Four classes were identified. Three differed in their baseline levels of unmet needs whereas the fourth had a marked decrease in such needs. Main predictors of class membership were prognosis and depression at baseline, and the quality of life and psychosocial intervention at follow-up. Depression at follow-up did not vary among classes.
CONCLUSIONS:

We identified subtypes of patients with different courses of unmet needs. Prognosis of clinical improvement was a better predictor for the decline in unmet needs than was psychopathology. Needs concerning social relationships were particularly persistent in patients who remained high in their unmet needs and who lacked additional psychosocial treatment.

Statistics

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

53 downloads since deposited on 20 Jan 2012
9 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:20 Jan 2012 16:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:26
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0033-2917
Additional Information:Copyright: Cambridge University Press
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291711002406
PubMed ID:22099529

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 148kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations