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Alanine transaminase individual variation is a better marker than socio-cultural factors for body mass increase in healthy males


Henneberg, M; Rühli, Frank J; Gruber, P; Woitek, U (2011). Alanine transaminase individual variation is a better marker than socio-cultural factors for body mass increase in healthy males. Food and Nutrition Sciences, 2(10):1054-1062.

Abstract

Overweight and obesity are considered a major burden on public health in developed countries. Underlying etiologies are enigmatic and metabolic causes have been suggested to various extents before. We analyze links of major blood parame-ters to individual body mass in a young male cohort, controlling for socio-cultural factors, in order to explore an underly-ing metabolic cause of obesity. Anthropometric (height, weight) physiologic (blood pressure) and metabolic data (total cholesterol, alanine transaminase, creatinine, postprandial glucose, blood cell counts, haemoglobin) of Swiss conscripts (N = 46,684; 18 - 20 yrs old; 2005-2007 census) were examined in the context of their socio-cultural groupings (occupa-tion, mother tongue, religion) by ANOVA and stepwise multiple regression analysis. Swiss Armed Forces recruiting is mandatory, thus each year’s group studied reflects more than 80% of a year’s male Swiss citizen birth cohort. Individual body mass index ranged from 19 kg/m2 (5th percentile) to 29 kg/m2 (95th percentile) with a median of 22 kg/m2. BMI in-creases significantly, even within its normal range (18.5 - 25 kg/m2) with increases in alanine transaminase (r2 = 0.10), total cholesterol (r2 = 0.08) and erythrocyte counts (r2 = 0.02). All other parameters, including socio-cultural categories, explain individually 1% or less of total BMI variation. Glucose values do not correlate with BMI significantly, thus sug-gesting a specific metabolic co-etiology of individual mass increases. There may occur a biochemical anomaly in liver metabolism that underlies development of the metabolic syndrome later in life. Were it so, pharmacological intervention rather than just diet and exercise regime could be more effective treatment of obesity.

Abstract

Overweight and obesity are considered a major burden on public health in developed countries. Underlying etiologies are enigmatic and metabolic causes have been suggested to various extents before. We analyze links of major blood parame-ters to individual body mass in a young male cohort, controlling for socio-cultural factors, in order to explore an underly-ing metabolic cause of obesity. Anthropometric (height, weight) physiologic (blood pressure) and metabolic data (total cholesterol, alanine transaminase, creatinine, postprandial glucose, blood cell counts, haemoglobin) of Swiss conscripts (N = 46,684; 18 - 20 yrs old; 2005-2007 census) were examined in the context of their socio-cultural groupings (occupa-tion, mother tongue, religion) by ANOVA and stepwise multiple regression analysis. Swiss Armed Forces recruiting is mandatory, thus each year’s group studied reflects more than 80% of a year’s male Swiss citizen birth cohort. Individual body mass index ranged from 19 kg/m2 (5th percentile) to 29 kg/m2 (95th percentile) with a median of 22 kg/m2. BMI in-creases significantly, even within its normal range (18.5 - 25 kg/m2) with increases in alanine transaminase (r2 = 0.10), total cholesterol (r2 = 0.08) and erythrocyte counts (r2 = 0.02). All other parameters, including socio-cultural categories, explain individually 1% or less of total BMI variation. Glucose values do not correlate with BMI significantly, thus sug-gesting a specific metabolic co-etiology of individual mass increases. There may occur a biochemical anomaly in liver metabolism that underlies development of the metabolic syndrome later in life. Were it so, pharmacological intervention rather than just diet and exercise regime could be more effective treatment of obesity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Zentrum für Evolutionäre Medizin
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:24 Jan 2012 19:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:26
Publisher:Scientific Research Publishing
ISSN:2157-944X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4236/fns.2011.210141
Related URLs:http://www.scirp.org/journal/fns/ (Publisher)

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