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Anatomical markers of sleep slow wave activity derived from structural magnetic resonance images


Buchmann, Andreas; Kurth, Salomé; Ringli, Maya; Geiger, Anja; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto (2011). Anatomical markers of sleep slow wave activity derived from structural magnetic resonance images. Journal of sleep research, 20(4):506-513.

Abstract

Sleep studies often observe differences in slow wave activity (SWA) during non-rapid eye movement sleep between subjects. This study investigates to what extent these absolute differences in SWA can be explained with differences in grey matter volume, white matter volume or the thickness of skull and outer liquor rooms. To do this, we selected the 10-min interval showing maximal SWA of 20 young adult subjects and correlated these values lobe-wise with grey matter, skull and liquor thickness and globally with white matter as well as segments of the corpus callosum. Whereas grey matter, skull thickness and liquor did not correlate significantly with maximal slow wave activity, there were significant correlations with the anterior parts of the corpus callosum and with one other white matter region. In contrast, electroencephalogram power of higher frequencies correlates positively with grey matter volumes and cortical surface area. We discuss the possible role of white matter tracts on the synchronization of slow waves across the cortex.

Abstract

Sleep studies often observe differences in slow wave activity (SWA) during non-rapid eye movement sleep between subjects. This study investigates to what extent these absolute differences in SWA can be explained with differences in grey matter volume, white matter volume or the thickness of skull and outer liquor rooms. To do this, we selected the 10-min interval showing maximal SWA of 20 young adult subjects and correlated these values lobe-wise with grey matter, skull and liquor thickness and globally with white matter as well as segments of the corpus callosum. Whereas grey matter, skull thickness and liquor did not correlate significantly with maximal slow wave activity, there were significant correlations with the anterior parts of the corpus callosum and with one other white matter region. In contrast, electroencephalogram power of higher frequencies correlates positively with grey matter volumes and cortical surface area. We discuss the possible role of white matter tracts on the synchronization of slow waves across the cortex.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:16 Apr 2013 11:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:27
ISSN:1365-2869
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2869.2011.00916.x
PubMed ID:21435064

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