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HDAC-mediated deacetylation of NF-κB is critical for Schwann cell myelination


Chen, Y; Wang, H; Yoon, S O; Xu, X; Hottiger, M O; Svaren, J; Nave, K A; Kim, H A; Olson, E N; Lu, Q R (2011). HDAC-mediated deacetylation of NF-κB is critical for Schwann cell myelination. Nature Neuroscience, 14(4):437-441.

Abstract

Schwann cell myelination is tightly regulated by timely expression of key transcriptional regulators that respond to specific environmental cues, but the molecular mechanisms underlying such a process are poorly understood. We found that the acetylation state of NF-κB, which is regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 2, is critical for orchestrating the myelination program. Mice lacking both HDACs 1 and 2 (HDAC1/2) exhibited severe myelin deficiency with Schwann cell development arrested at the immature stage. NF-κB p65 became heavily acetylated in HDAC1/2 mutants, inhibiting the expression of positive regulators of myelination and inducing the expression of differentiation inhibitors. We observed that the NF-κB protein complex switched from associating with p300 to associating with HDAC1/2 as Schwann cells differentiated. NF-κB and HDAC1/2 acted in a coordinated fashion to regulate the transcriptionally linked chromatin state for Schwann cell myelination. Thus, our results reveal an HDAC-mediated developmental switch for controlling myelination in the peripheral nervous system.

Abstract

Schwann cell myelination is tightly regulated by timely expression of key transcriptional regulators that respond to specific environmental cues, but the molecular mechanisms underlying such a process are poorly understood. We found that the acetylation state of NF-κB, which is regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 2, is critical for orchestrating the myelination program. Mice lacking both HDACs 1 and 2 (HDAC1/2) exhibited severe myelin deficiency with Schwann cell development arrested at the immature stage. NF-κB p65 became heavily acetylated in HDAC1/2 mutants, inhibiting the expression of positive regulators of myelination and inducing the expression of differentiation inhibitors. We observed that the NF-κB protein complex switched from associating with p300 to associating with HDAC1/2 as Schwann cells differentiated. NF-κB and HDAC1/2 acted in a coordinated fashion to regulate the transcriptionally linked chromatin state for Schwann cell myelination. Thus, our results reveal an HDAC-mediated developmental switch for controlling myelination in the peripheral nervous system.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:28 Feb 2012 13:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:28
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1097-6256
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2780
PubMed ID:21423191

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